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National Homebrew Competition 2014

This style guide was created with the Brewers Association 2014 Beer Style Guidelines, used with permission of the Brewers Association and reproduced unchanged. You can download the original PDF version here.

Category 1 - British Origin Ale Styles

  • 1A - Ordinary Bitter

    Comments

    Ordinary Bitters are gold to copper colored. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Fruity-ester and very low diacetyl aromas are acceptable, but should be minimized. Hop aroma may be evident at the brewer's discretion. Low to medium residual malt sweetness is present. Hop flavor may be evident at the brewer's discretion. Hop bitterness is mediufm. Mild carbonation traditionally characterizes draft-cask versions, but in bottled versions, a slight increase in carbon dioxide content is acceptable. Fruity-ester and very low diacetyl flavors are acceptable, but should be minimized in this form of bitter. Body is light to medium. English and American hop character may be specified in subcategories.

    Stats

    OG 1.033 — 1.038
    FG 1.006 — 1.012
    ABV 3.0 — 4.2
    IBU 20.0 — 35.0
    SRM 10.0 — 24.0
  • 1B - Special Bitter or Best Bitter

    Comments

    Special Bitter or Best Bitters are deep gold to deep copper colored. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Fruity-ester aroma is acceptable. Hop aroma may be very low to medium at the brewer's discretion. Medium residual malt sweetness is present. Hop flavor may be very low to medium at brewer's discretion. Hop bitterness is medium and absent of harshness. Mild carbonation traditionally characterizes draft-cask versions, but in bottled versions, a slight increase in carbon dioxide content is acceptable. Fruity-ester and very low diacetyl flavors are acceptable, but should be minimized in this form of bitter. The absence of diacetyl is also acceptable. Body is medium. English and American hop character may be specified in subcategories.

    Stats

    OG 1.038 — 1.045
    FG 1.006 — 1.012
    ABV 4.2 — 4.8
    IBU 28.0 — 40.0
    SRM 12.0 — 28.0
  • 1C - Extra Special Bitter

    Comments

    Extra Special Bitters are amber to deep copper colored. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Fruity-ester aroma is acceptable. Hop aroma is medium to medium-high. The residual malt and defining sweetness of this richly flavored, full-bodied bitter is medium to medium-high. Hop flavor is medium to medium-high. Hop bitterness is medium to medium-high. Mild carbonation traditionally characterizes draft-cask versions, but in bottled versions, a slight increase in carbon dioxide content is acceptable. The overall impression is refreshing and thirst quenching. Fruity-ester and very low diacetyl flavors are acceptable, but should be minimized in this form of bitter. The absence of diacetyl is also acceptable. Body is full. English and American hop character may be specified in subcategories.

    Stats

    OG 1.046 — 1.06
    FG 1.01 — 1.016
    ABV 4.8 — 5.8
    IBU 30.0 — 45.0
    SRM 16.0 — 28.0
  • 1D - Scottish-Style Light Ale

    Comments

    Scottish-Style Light Ales are golden to light brown. Chill haze is allowable at low temperatures. Malty, caramel- like aroma may be present. Fruity-ester aromas are low if evident. Hop aroma is not perceived. Despite its lightness a low to medium-low degree of malty, caramel-like, soft and chewy character will be present. Hop flavor is not perceived. Hop bitterness is low. Yeast characters such as diacetyl and sulfuriness are acceptable at very low levels. Bottled versions may contain higher amounts of carbon dioxide than is typical for mildly carbonated draft versions. Though there is little evidence suggesting that traditionally made Scottish Light Ale exhibited peat smoke character, the current marketplace offers many examples with peat or smoke character present at low to medium levels. Thus a peaty/smoky character may be evident at low levels. Ales with medium or higher smoke character would be considered a smoke flavored beer and considered in another category. Body is light. Scottish Light Ale may be split into two subcategories: Traditional (no smoke character) and Peated (low level of peat smoke character).

    Stats

    OG 1.03 — 1.035
    FG 1.006 — 1.012
    ABV 2.8 — 3.5
    IBU 9.0 — 20.0
    SRM 12.0 — 30.0
  • 1E - Scottish-Style Heavy Ale

    Comments

    Scottish-Style Heavy Ales are amber to dark brown. Chill haze is allowable at low temperatures. Malty, caramel- like aroma is present. Fruity-ester aromas are low if evident. Hop aroma is not perceived. Scottish Heavy is dominated by a smooth, balanced sweet maltiness; in addition it will have a medium degree of malty, caramel-like, soft and chewy character in flavor and mouthfeel. Hop flavor is not perceived. Hop bitterness is low but perceptible. Yeast characters such as diacetyl and sulfuriness are acceptable at very low levels. Bottled versions may contain higher amounts of carbon dioxide than is typical for mildly carbonated draft versions. Though there is little evidence suggesting that traditionally made Scottish Heavy Ale exhibited peat smoke character, the current marketplace offers many examples with peat or smoke character present at low to medium levels. Thus a peaty/smoky character may be evident at low levels. Ales with medium or higher smoke character would be considered a smoke flavored beer and considered in another category. Body is medium. Scottish Heavy Ale may be split into two subcategories: Traditional (no smoke character) and Peated (low level of peat smoke character).

    Stats

    OG 1.035 — 1.04
    FG 1.01 — 1.014
    ABV 3.5 — 4.1
    IBU 12.0 — 20.0
    SRM 16.0 — 38.0
  • 1F - Scottish-Style Export Ale

    Comments

    Scottish-Style Export Ales are medium amber to dark chestnut brown. Chill haze is allowable at low temperatures. Malty, caramel-like aroma dominates. Fruity-ester aromas may be apparent. Hop aroma is not perceived. The overriding character of Scottish Export is sweet, caramel-like, and malty. Hop flavor is not perceived. Hop bitterness is low to medium. Fruity-ester character may be apparent. Yeast characters such as diacetyl and sulfuriness are acceptable at very low levels. Bottled versions may contain higher amounts of carbon dioxide than is typical for mildly carbonated draft versions. Though there is little evidence suggesting that traditionally made Scottish Export Ale exhibited peat smoke character, the current marketplace offers many examples with peat or smoke character present at low to medium levels. Thus a peaty/smoky character may be evident at low levels. Ales with medium or higher smoke character would be considered a smoke flavored beer and considered in another category. Body is medium. Scottish Export Ale may be split into two subcategories: Traditional (no smoke character) and Peated (low level of peat smoke character).

    Stats

    OG 1.04 — 1.05
    FG 1.01 — 1.018
    ABV 4.1 — 5.3
    IBU 15.0 — 25.0
    SRM 18.0 — 38.0
  • 1G - English-Style Summer Ale

    Comments

    English-Style Summer Ales are pale to light amber. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Fruity-ester aromas are acceptable at low to moderate levels. No diacetyl or DMS aromas should be apparent. Hop aroma is low to medium-low. English, American or noble-type hop aroma should not be assertive and always well balanced with malt aroma. Residual malt sweetness is low to medium. Torrefied and/or malted wheat are often used in quantities of 25% or less. Malt flavor may be biscuit-like. Hop flavor is low to medium-low. English, American, or noble-type hop flavor should not be assertive and always well balanced with malt character. Hop bitterness is medium-low to medium. Mild carbonation traditionally characterizes draft-cask versions, but in bottled versions, a slight increase in carbon dioxide content is acceptable. The overall impression is refreshing and thirst quenching. Low to moderate fruity-ester flavors are acceptable. No diacetyl or DMS flavors should be apparent. Body is low to medium-low.

    Stats

    OG 1.036 — 1.05
    FG 1.006 — 1.012
    ABV 3.7 — 5.1
    IBU 20.0 — 30.0
    SRM 8.0 — 14.0
  • 1H - Classic English-Style Pale Ale

    Comments

    Classic English-Style Pale Ales are gold to copper colored. Chill haze may be evident only at very cold temperatures. Low to medium malt aroma and moderate to strong fruity-ester aroma are present. Hop aroma is medium to medium-high. Low to medium malt flavor is present, and low caramel character is allowable. Hop flavor is medium to medium-high. Earthy and herbal English-variety hop character is the perceived end, but may be a result of the skillful use of hops of other national origins. Hop bitterness is medium to medium-high. Fruity-ester flavors are moderate to strong. Absence of diacetyl is desirable, though, diacetyl is acceptable and characteristic when at very low levels. Body is medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.04 — 1.056
    FG 1.008 — 1.016
    ABV 4.4 — 5.3
    IBU 20.0 — 40.0
    SRM 10.0 — 24.0
  • 1I - English-Style India Pale Ale

    Comments

    English-Style India Pale Ales are gold to copper colored. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Fruity-ester aromas are moderate to very strong. Hop aroma is medium to high, often flowery. Medium malt flavor is present. Hop flavor is medium to strong (in addition to the hop bitterness). Hops from a variety of origins may be used to contribute to a high hopping rate. Earthy and herbal English-variety hop character is the perceived end, but may be a result of the skillful use of hops of other national origins. Hop bitterness is medium to high. Fruity-ester flavors are moderate to very strong. Most traditional interpretations are characterized by medium to medium-high alcohol content. The use of water with high mineral content results in a crisp, dry beer, sometimes with subtle and balanced character of sulfur compounds. Diacetyl can be absent or may be perceived at very low levels. Hops of other origins may be used for bitterness or approximating traditional English character. Body is medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.05 — 1.064
    FG 1.012 — 1.018
    ABV 5.1 — 7.1
    IBU 35.0 — 63.0
    SRM 12.0 — 28.0
  • 1J - Strong Ale

    Comments

    Strong Ales are amber to dark brown. Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures. Rich, often complex fruity- esters can contribute to the aroma profile. Hop aroma is not perceived to very low. They have malty and/or caramel- like sweetness. They may have very low levels of roast malt. Hop flavor is not perceived to medium. Hop bitterness is minimal but evident, and balanced with the malt flavors present. Fruity-ester flavors can contribute to the character of this ale as a rich, often sweet and complex estery character. Alcohol types can be varied and complex. Very low levels of diacetyl are acceptable. Body is medium to full. This style may often be split into two categories, strong and very strong.

    Stats

    OG 1.06 — 1.125
    FG 1.014 — 1.04
    ABV 7.0 — 11.3
    IBU 30.0 — 65.0
    SRM 16.0 — 42.0
  • 1K - Old Ale

    Comments

    Old Ales are copper-red to very dark. Chill haze is acceptable at cold temperatures. Fruity-ester aroma can contribute to the aroma profile. Hop aroma is very low. They have a malty and sometimes caramel-like sweetness. Hop flavor is not perceived to medium. Hop bitterness is minimal but evident. Fruity-ester flavors can contribute to the character of this ale. Alcohol types can be varied and complex. A distinctive quality of these ales is that they undergo an aging process (often for years) on their yeast either in bulk storage or through conditioning in the bottle, which contributes to a rich, wine-like and often sweet oxidation character. Complex estery characters may also emerge. Very low diacetyl character may be evident and acceptable. Wood aged characters such as vanillin and other woody characters are acceptable. Horsey, goaty, leathery and phenolic character evolved from Brettanomyces organisms and acidity may be present but should be at low levels and balanced with other flavors. Residual flavors that come from liquids previously aged in a barrel such as bourbon or sherry should not be present. Body is medium to full. This style may often be split into two categories, strong and very strong. Brettanomyces organisms and acidic characters reflect historical character. Competition organizers may choose to distinguish these types of old ale from modern versions.

    Stats

    OG 1.058 — 1.088
    FG 1.014 — 1.03
    ABV 6.3 — 9.1
    IBU 30.0 — 65.0
    SRM 24.0 — 60.0
  • 1L - English-Style Pale Mild Ale

    Comments

    English-Style Pale Mild Ales are light amber to medium amber. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Fruity-ester aroma is very low to medium low. Hop aroma is very low or low. Malt flavor dominates the flavor profile. Hop flavor is very low to low. Hop bitterness is very low to low. Very low diacetyl flavors may be appropriate in this low-alcohol beer. Fruity-ester flavor is very low to medium low. Body is low to low-medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.03 — 1.036
    FG 1.004 — 1.008
    ABV 3.4 — 4.4
    IBU 10.0 — 20.0
    SRM 12.0 — 18.0
  • 1M - English-Style Dark Mild Ale

    Comments

    English-Style Dark Mild Ales are reddish brown to very dark. Fruity-ester aroma is very low to medium low. Malt and caramel are part of the aroma while licorice and roast malt tones may sometimes contribute to aroma profile. Hop aroma is very low. Malt flavor and caramel are part of the flavor profile while licorice and roast malt tones may also contribute. Hop flavor is very low. Hop bitterness is very low to low. Very low diacetyl flavors may be appropriate in this low-alcohol beer. Fruity-ester flavor is very low to medium low. Body is low-medium to medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.03 — 1.036
    FG 1.004 — 1.008
    ABV 3.4 — 4.4
    IBU 10.0 — 24.0
    SRM 34.0 — 68.0
  • 1N - English-Style Brown Ale

    Comments

    English-Style Brown Ales are copper to very dark. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Low to medium- low fruity-ester aroma is appropriate. Roast malt tones may sometimes contribute a biscuit/toasted character to aroma profile. Hop aroma is very low. Balance ranges from dry to sweet maltiness. Roast malt tones may sometimes contribute to flavor profile. Hop flavor is very low. Hop bitterness is very low to low. Low to medium-low levels of fruity-ester flavors are appropriate. Diacetyl if evident should be very low. Body is medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.04 — 1.05
    FG 1.008 — 1.014
    ABV 4.2 — 6.0
    IBU 15.0 — 25.0
    SRM 24.0 — 50.0
  • 1O - Brown Porter

    Comments

    Brown Porters are dark brown (may have red tint) to very dark. Fruity-ester aroma is acceptable. Hop aroma is negligible to medium. No roast barley or strong burnt/black malt character should be perceived. Low to medium malt sweetness, caramel and chocolate is acceptable. Hop flavor is negligible to medium. Hop bitterness is medium. Fruity-ester flavors are acceptable. Body is light to medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.04 — 1.05
    FG 1.006 — 1.014
    ABV 4.4 — 6.0
    IBU 20.0 — 30.0
    SRM 40.0 — 70.0
  • 1P - Robust Porter

    Comments

    Robust Porters are very dark to black. Hop aroma is very low to medium. They have a roast malt flavor, often reminiscent of cocoa, but no roast barley flavor. Caramel and other malty sweetness is in harmony with a sharp bitterness of black malt without a highly burnt/charcoal flavor. Hop flavor is very low to medium. Hop bitterness is medium to high. Diacetyl is acceptable at very low levels. Fruity esters should be evident, balanced with all other characters. Body is medium to full.

    Stats

    OG 1.045 — 1.06
    FG 1.008 — 1.016
    ABV 5.1 — 6.6
    IBU 25.0 — 40.0
  • 1Q - Sweet Stout or Cream Stout

    Comments

    Sweet Stout or Cream Stouts are black. Malt sweetness, chocolate, and caramel should contribute to the aroma. Fruity-ester aroma is low if present. Hop aroma is not perceived. Malt sweetness, chocolate, and caramel flavor should dominate the flavor profile. They should also have low to medium-low roasted malt/barley derived bitterness. Hop flavor is not perceived. Hop bitterness is low to medium low and serve to balance and suppress some of the sweetness without contributing apparent flavor and aroma. Fruity ester flavors are low if present. Body is full with an overall sweet impression; the style can be given more body with milk sugar (lactose) before bottling.

    Stats

    OG 1.045 — 1.056
    FG 1.012 — 1.02
    ABV 3.2 — 6.3
    IBU 15.0 — 25.0
  • 1R - Oatmeal Stout

    Comments

    Oatmeal Stouts are dark brown to black. Coffee-like roasted barley and roasted malt aromas are prominent. Caramel-like and chocolate-like roasted malt aroma should be evident. Fruity-ester aroma is not perceived to very low. Hop aroma is optional, but should not overpower the overall balance if present. A roasted malt character which is caramel-like and chocolate-like should be evident, smooth and not bitter. Hop flavor is optional, but should not overpower the overall balance if present. Hop bitterness is medium. Oatmeal is used in the grist, resulting in a pleasant, full flavor without being grainy. Fruity ester flavor is very low. Diacetyl should be absent or at extremely low levels. Body is full.

    Stats

    OG 1.038 — 1.056
    FG 1.008 — 1.02
    ABV 3.8 — 6.1
    IBU 20.0 — 40.0
  • 1S - Scotch Ale

    Comments

    Scotch Ales are light-reddish brown to very dark. Chill haze is allowable at low temperatures. Rich dominant sweet malt aroma is present. Fruity-ester aroma if present is very low. Hop aroma is not perceived to very low. They are overwhelmingly malty with a rich and dominant sweet malt flavor; a caramel character is often part of the profile. Dark roasted malt flavors may be evident at low levels. Hop flavor is not perceived to very low. Hop bitterness is perceived to be very low. If present, fruity-esters are generally at low levels. Low diacetyl levels are acceptable. A brewery fresh experience is intended in these beers, thus oxidation is not an acceptable character. Pleasantly oxidized Scotch Ales can be entered in "Aged Beer" categories. Body is full. Scotch Ales may be split into two subcategories: Traditional (no smoke character) and Peated (low level of peat smoke character). Though there is little evidence suggesting that traditionally made Strong Scotch Ales exhibited peat smoke character, the current marketplace offers many examples with peat or smoke character present at low to medium levels. Thus a peaty/smoky character may be evident at low levels in peated versions.

    Stats

    OG 1.072 — 1.085
    FG 1.016 — 1.028
    ABV 6.6 — 8.5
    IBU 25.0 — 35.0
    SRM 30.0 — 60.0
  • 1T - British-Style Imperial Stout

    Comments

    British-Style Imperial Stouts are dark copper to very dark. Hop aroma is very low to medium, with qualities such as floral, -citrus or -herbal. Extremely rich malty flavor, often characterized as toffee-like or caramel-like, is sometimes accompanied by very low (sometimes absent) roasted malt astringency. Hop flavor is very low to medium. Hop bitterness is medium, and should not overwhelm the overall balance. The bitterness may be higher in darker versions yet balanced with sweet malt. High alcohol content is evident. High fruity-ester character may be present. Diacetyl should be absent.

    Stats

    OG 1.08 — 1.1
    FG 1.02 — 1.03
    ABV 7.0 — 12.0
    IBU 45.0 — 65.0
  • 1U - British-Style Barley Wine Ale

    Comments

    British-Style Barley Wine Ales are tawny copper to deep red/copper-garnet. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Hop aroma is very low to medium. Residual malty sweetness is high. Hop flavor is very low to medium. Hop bitterness is perceived to be low to medium. English type hops are often used but not necessary for this style. Complexity of alcohols and fruity-ester characters are often high and balanced with the high alcohol content. Low levels of diacetyl may be acceptable. Caramel and some characters indicating oxidation (vinous aromas and/or flavors) may be considered positive. Body is full.

    Stats

    OG 1.085 — 1.12
    FG 1.024 — 1.028
    ABV 8.5 — 12.2
    IBU 40.0 — 60.0
    SRM 28.0 — 36.0

Category 2 - Irish Origin Ale Styles

  • 2A - Irish-Style Red Ale

    Comments

    Irish-Style Red Ales are copper red to reddish brown. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Slight yeast haze is acceptable for bottle-conditioned products. Low fruity-ester aroma is acceptable. Hop aroma is not perceived to low. Low to medium candy-like caramel malt sweetness is present. May have subtle degree of roast barley or roast malt character and complexity. Hop flavor is medium. Hop bitterness is medium. Low levels of fruity-ester flavor are acceptable. Diacetyl should be absent or at very low levels. Body is medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.04 — 1.048
    FG 1.01 — 1.014
    ABV 4.1 — 4.6
    IBU 20.0 — 28.0
    SRM 22.0 — 36.0
  • 2B - Classic Irish-Style Dry Stout

    Comments

    Classic Irish-Style Dry Stouts are black. Head retention and rich character should be part of its visual character. The emphasis of coffee-like roasted barley and a moderate degree of roasted malt aromas define much of the character. Hop aroma is European type at low levels or not perceived. Dry stouts achieve a dry-roasted character through the use of roasted barley. Initial malt and light caramel flavor profile give way to a distinctive dry-roasted bitterness in the finish. Emphasis of coffee-like roasted barley and a moderate degree of roasted malt flavors define much of the character. Hop flavor is European type at low levels or not perceived. Hop bitterness is perceived as medium to medium high. Fruity esters are minimal and overshadowed by malt, high hop bitterness and roasted barley character. Diacetyl should not be perceived to very low. Slight acidity may be perceived but not necessary. Body is medium-light to medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.038 — 1.048
    FG 1.008 — 1.012
    ABV 4.1 — 5.3
    IBU 30.0 — 40.0
  • 2C - Foreign (Export)-Style Stout

    Comments

    Foreign (Export)-Style Stouts are black. Head retention is excellent. Coffee-like roasted barley and roasted malt aromas are prominent. Fruity-ester aroma is low. Hop aroma is not perceived. Initial malt and light caramel flavor profile give way to a distinctive dry-roasted bitterness in the finish. Hop flavor is not perceived. Hop bitterness is often analytically high, but the perception is often compromised by malt sweetness. Perception of fruity ester flavor is low. Diacetyl should be negligible or not perceived. Slight acidity is acceptable. Body is medium to full.

    Stats

    OG 1.052 — 1.072
    FG 1.008 — 1.02
    ABV 5.7 — 9.5
    IBU 30.0 — 60.0

Category 3 - North American Origin Ale Styles

  • 3A - Golden or Blonde Ale

    Comments

    Golden or Blonde Ales are straw to light amber. Chill haze should be absent. Hop aroma is low to medium-low, present but not dominant. Light malt sweetness is present. Hop flavor is low to medium-low, present but not dominant. Hop bitterness is low to medium. Fruity esters may be perceived but not predominant. Diacetyl should not be perceived. DMS should not be perceived. Body is crisp, light to medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.045 — 1.056
    FG 1.008 — 1.016
    ABV 4.1 — 5.1
    IBU 15.0 — 25.0
    SRM 6.0 — 14.0
  • 3B - American-Style Amber/Red Ale

    Comments

    American-Style Amber/Red Ales are copper to reddish brown. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Fruity-ester aroma is low if present. Hop aroma is medium. Medium-high to high maltiness with medium to low caramel character is present. Hop flavor is medium, and characterized by American-variety hops. Hop bitterness is medium to medium-high. They may have low levels of fruity-ester flavor. Diacetyl can be absent or barely perceived at very low levels. Body is medium to medium-high.

    Stats

    OG 1.048 — 1.058
    FG 1.012 — 1.018
    ABV 4.4 — 6.1
    IBU 30.0 — 45.0
    SRM 22.0 — 36.0
  • 3C - American-Style Pale Ale

    Comments

    American-Style Pale Ales are deep golden to copper or light brown. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Low caramel malt aroma is allowable. Fruity-ester aroma should be moderate to strong. Hop aroma is medium to medium-high, exhibiting fruity, floral, and citrus-like American-variety hop aromas. Low to medium maltiness may include low caramel malt character. Hop flavor is medium to medium-high, exhibiting fruity, floral, and citrus-like American-variety hop flavors. Hop bitterness is medium to medium-high. Fruity-ester flavor should be moderate to strong. Diacetyl should be absent or very low. Note that the “traditional” style of this beer has its origins with certain floral, fruity, citrus-like, piney, resinous, or sulfur-like American hop varietals. One or more of these hop characters is the perceived end, but the perceived hop characters may be a result of the skillful use of hops of other national origins. Body is medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.044 — 1.05
    FG 1.008 — 1.014
    ABV 4.4 — 5.4
    IBU 30.0 — 50.0
    SRM 12.0 — 28.0
  • 3D - American-Style Strong Pale Ale

    Comments

    American-Style Strong Pale Ales are deep golden to copper. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Low caramel malt aroma is allowable. Fruity-ester aroma should be moderate to strong. Hop aroma is high, exhibiting floral, fruity, citrus-like, piney, resinous, or sulfur-like American-variety hop characters. Low level maltiness may include low caramel malt character. Hop flavor is high, exhibiting floral, fruity, citrus-like, piney, resinous, or sulfur-like American-variety hop flavors. Hop bitterness is high. Fruity-ester flavor is moderate to strong. Diacetyl should be absent or low if present. Body is medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.05 — 1.06
    FG 1.008 — 1.016
    ABV 5.6 — 6.3
    IBU 40.0 — 50.0
    SRM 12.0 — 28.0
  • 3E - American-Style India Pale Ale

    Comments

    American-Style India Pale Ales are gold to copper or red/brown. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures and hop haze is allowable at any temperature. Fruity-ester aroma is moderate to very high. Hop aroma is high with floral qualities, and is further characterized by citrus-like, piney, resinous or sulfur-like American-variety hop character. Medium maltiness is present. Hop flavor is strong, characterized by fruity, citrus-like, piney, resinous or sulfur-like American-variety hop character. One or more of these American-variety hop characters is the perceived end, but the hop characters may be a result of the skillful use of hops of other national origins. Hop bitterness is medium-high to very high. Fruity-ester flavors are moderate to very high. Diacetyl can be absent or very low. The use of water with high mineral content results in a crisp, dry beer. Body is medium. English and citrus-like American hops are considered enough of a distinction justifying separate American-style IPA and English-Style IPA categories or subcategories. Hops of other origins may be used for bitterness or approximating traditional American or English character. See English-style India Pale Ale.

    Stats

    OG 1.06 — 1.075
    FG 1.012 — 1.018
    ABV 6.3 — 7.6
    IBU 50.0 — 70.0
    SRM 12.0 — 28.0
  • 3F - Pale American-Belgo-Style Ale

    Comments

    Pale American-Belgo-Style Ales are gold to light brown. Chill haze may be evident. Fruity-ester aroma is medium to high. Hop aroma is medium to very high, exhibiting American type hop aromas not usually found in traditional Belgian styles. Hop flavor is medium to very high. Hop bitterness is medium to very high. Fruity-ester flavor should be medium to high. Yeast derived characters such as banana, berry, apple, sometimes coriander spice-like and/or smoky-phenolic characters should be portrayed with balance of hops and malt character when fermented with Belgian yeasts. Diacetyl should be absent. Sulfur-like yeast character should be absent. Brettanomyces character should be absent. Pale American-Belgo-Style Ales are either 1) non-Belgian beer types portraying the unique characters imparted by yeasts typically used in big fruity Belgian-style ales, or 2) defined Belgian-style beers portraying a unique character of American hops. These beers are unique beers unto themselves. To allow for accurate judging the brewer must provide information that identifies the classic beer style being elaborated upon (if there is one) or other information unique to the entry with regard to flavor, aroma and/or appearance. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

    Stats

    SRM 10.0 — 30.0
  • 3G - Dark American-Belgo-Style Ale

    Comments

    Dark American-Belgo-Style Ales are brown to black. Chill haze may be evident. Fruity-ester aroma is medium to high. Hop aroma is medium to very high, exhibiting American type hop aromas not usually found in traditional Belgian styles. Perception of roasted malts or barley will be subtle to robust. Hop flavor is medium to very high. Hop bitterness is medium to very high. Fruity-ester flavor should be medium to high. Yeast derived characters such as banana, berry, apple, sometimes coriander spice-like and/or smoky-phenolic characters should be portrayed with balance of hops and malt character when fermented with Belgian yeasts. Diacetyl should be absent. Sulfur-like yeast character should be absent. Brettanomyces character should be absent; mixed tradition ales exhibiting Brettanomyces character would more appropriately be classified as American-style Brett Ale. Dark American- Belgo-Style Ales are either 1) non-Belgian darker beer types portraying the unique characters imparted by yeasts typically used in big fruity Belgian-style ales, or 2) defined darker Belgian-style beers portraying a unique character of American hops. These beers are unique beers unto themselves. To allow for accurate judging the brewer must provide information that identifies the classic beer style being elaborated upon (if there is one) or other information unique to the entry with regard to flavor, aroma and/or appearance. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

  • 3H - American-Style Brown Ale

    Comments

    American-Style Brown Ales are deep copper to very dark brown. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Fruity-ester aromas should be subdued. Roasted malt caramel-like and chocolate-like aromas should be medium. Hop aroma is low to medium. Roasted malt caramel-like and chocolate-like flavors should be medium. Hop flavor is low to medium. Hop bitterness is medium to high. Fruity-ester flavors should be subdued. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Body is medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.04 — 1.06
    FG 1.01 — 1.018
    ABV 4.2 — 6.3
    IBU 25.0 — 45.0
    SRM 30.0 — 52.0
  • 3I - American-Style Black Ale

    Comments

    American-Style Black Ales are very dark to black. Medium caramel malt and dark roasted malt aromas are evident. Hop aroma is medium-high to high, with fruity, floral, herbal or other hop aroma from hops of all origins contributing. Medium caramel malt and dark roasted malt flavors are evident. High astringency and high degree of burnt roast malt should be absent. Hop flavor is medium-high, with fruity, floral, herbal or other hop flavor from hops of all origins contributing. Hop bitterness is medium-high to high. Body is medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.056 — 1.075
    FG 1.012 — 1.018
    ABV 6.3 — 7.6
    IBU 50.0 — 70.0
  • 3J - American-Style Stout

    Comments

    American-Style Stouts are black. Head retention is excellent. Fruity-ester aroma is low. Coffee-like roasted barley and roasted malt aromas are prominent. Hop aroma is medium to high, often with American citrus-type and/or resiny hop aromas. Low to medium malt sweetness with low to medium caramel, chocolate, and/or roasted coffee flavor is present, with a distinctive dry-roasted bitterness in the finish. Roasted barley and roasted malt contribution to astringency is low and not excessive. Slight roasted malt acidity is permissible. Hop flavor is medium to high, often with American citrus-type and/or resiny hop flavors. Hop bitterness is medium to high. Fruity-ester flavor is low. Diacetyl should be negligible or not perceived. Body is perceived as a medium to full.

    Stats

    OG 1.05 — 1.075
    FG 1.01 — 1.022
    ABV 5.7 — 8.9
    IBU 35.0 — 60.0
  • 3K - American-Style Imperial Stout

    Comments

    American-Style Imperial Stouts are black. Extremely rich malty aroma is typical. Fruity-ester aroma is generally high. Diacetyl aroma should be absent. Hop aroma is medium-high to high with floral, citrus and/or herbal hop aromas. Extremely rich malty flavor with full sweet malt character is typical. Roasted malt astringency and bitterness can be moderately perceived but should not overwhelm the overall character. Hop flavor is medium-high to high floral, citrus and/or herbal hop flavors. Hop bitterness is medium-high to very high and balanced with the malt personality. Fruity-ester flavors are generally high. Diacetyl should be absent.

    Stats

    OG 1.08 — 1.1
    FG 1.02 — 1.03
    ABV 7.0 — 12.0
    IBU 50.0 — 80.0
  • 3L - American-Style Imperial Porter

    Comments

    American-Style Imperial Porters are black. Ale-like fruity ester aromas should be evident but not overpowering, complimenting malt and hop aromas. Hop aroma is low to medium-high. No roast barley or strong burnt/black malt character should be perceived. Medium malt, caramel and cocoa-like sweetness is present. Hop flavor is low to medium-high. Hop bitterness is medium-low to medium. Ale-like fruity ester flavors should be evident but not overpowering, complimenting hop character and malt derived sweetness. Diacetyl should be absent. Body is full.

    Stats

    OG 1.08 — 1.1
    FG 1.02 — 1.03
    ABV 7.0 — 12.0
    IBU 35.0 — 50.0
  • 3M - Imperial or Double India Pale Ale

    Comments

    Imperial or Double India Pale Ales are gold to chestnut red/brown. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures and hop haze is allowable at any temperature. Hop aroma is very high. Hop aroma should be fresh and lively, from any variety of hops. Malt character is medium to high. Hop flavor is very high, and should be fresh and lively and should not be harsh in quality, deriving from any variety of hops. Hop bitterness is very high but not harsh. Alcohol content is medium-high to high and notably evident. Fruity ester flavor is high. Diacetyl should not be perceived. The intention of this style of beer is to exhibit the fresh and bright character of hops. Oxidative character and aged character should not be present. Body is medium-high to full.

    Stats

    OG 1.075 — 1.1
    FG 1.012 — 1.02
    ABV 7.6 — 10.6
    IBU 65.0 — 100.0
    SRM 10.0 — 32.0
  • 3N - Imperial or Double Red Ale

    Comments

    Imperial or Double Red Ales are deep amber to dark copper/reddish brown. May exhibit a small amount of chill haze at cold temperatures. Fruity-ester aroma is medium. Hop aroma is intense, arising from any variety of hops. Medium to high caramel malt character is present. Hop flavor is intense, but balanced with other beer characters. They may use any variety of hops. Hop bitterness is intense. Alcohol content is very high and of notable character. Complex alcohol flavors may be evident. Fruity ester flavors are medium. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Body is full.

    Stats

    OG 1.08 — 1.1
    FG 1.02 — 1.028
    ABV 8.0 — 10.6
    IBU 55.0 — 85.0
    SRM 20.0 — 34.0
  • 3O - American-Style Barley Wine Ale

    Comments

    American-Style Barley Wine Ales are amber to deep red/copper-garnet. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Fruity-ester aroma is often high. Caramel and/or toffee malt aromas are often present. Hop aroma is medium to very high. High residual malty sweetness, often containing a caramel and/or toffee flavors is present. Hop flavor is medium to very high. American type hops are often used but not necessary for this style. Hop bitterness is high. Complexity of alcohols is evident. Fruity-ester flavor is often high. Very low levels of diacetyl may be acceptable. Characters indicating oxidation, such as vinous (sometimes sherry-like) aromas and/or flavors, are not generally acceptable in American-style barley wine ales, however if a low level of age-induced oxidation character harmonizes and enhances the overall experience this can be regarded favorably. Body is full.

    Stats

    OG 1.09 — 1.12
    FG 1.024 — 1.028
    ABV 8.5 — 12.2
    IBU 60.0 — 100.0
    SRM 22.0 — 36.0
  • 3P - American-Style Wheat Wine Ale

    Comments

    American-Style Wheat Wine Ales are gold to light brown. Chill haze is allowable. Fruity-ester aroma is often high and counterbalanced with complex alcohol character. Bready, wheat, honey-like and/or caramel malt aromas are often present. Hop aroma is low to medium. High residual malt sweetness is present. Bready, wheat, honey-like and/or caramel flavors are often part of malt character. Hop flavor is low to medium. Hop bitterness is medium to medium-high. Fruity-ester flavors are often high and counterbalanced by complexity of alcohols and high alcohol content. This style is brewed with 50% or more wheat malt. Very low levels of diacetyl may be acceptable. Phenolic yeast character, sulfur, and/or DMS should not be present. Oxidized, stale and aged characters are not typical of this style. Body is full.

    Stats

    OG 1.088 — 1.12
    FG 1.024 — 1.032
    ABV 8.5 — 12.2
    IBU 45.0 — 85.0
    SRM 10.0 — 30.0
  • 3Q - Smoke Porter

    Comments

    Smoke Porters are dark brown to black. Fruity-ester aroma is acceptable. They will exhibit a mild to assertive smoke malt aroma in balance with other aroma characters. Hop aroma is not perceived to medium. They will exhibit a mild to assertive smoke malt flavor in balance with other flavors. Black malt character can be perceived in some porters, while others may be absent of strong roast character. Roast barley character should be absent. Medium to high malt sweetness, caramel and chocolate are acceptable. Hop flavor is not perceived to medium. Hop bitterness is medium to medium-high. Fruity-ester flavor is acceptable. Body is medium to full. To allow for accurate judging the brewer must list the traditional style of porter as well as the wood type used as a smoke source (e.g. “alder smoked brown porter”). Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

    Stats

    OG 1.04 — 1.05
    FG 1.006 — 1.014
    ABV 5.1 — 8.9
    IBU 20.0 — 40.0
  • 3R - American-Style Brett Beer

    Comments

    American-Style Brett Beers are any range of color and may take on the color of added fruits or other ingredients. Chill haze, bacteria and yeast-induced haze are allowable at low to medium levels at any temperature. Moderate to intense yet balanced fruity-ester aromas are evident. In darker versions, roasted malt, caramel-like and chocolate- like aromas are subtly present. Diacetyl and DMS aromas should not be perceived. Hop aroma is evident over a full range from low to high. In darker versions, roasted malt, caramel-like and chocolate-like flavors are subtly present. Fruited versions will exhibit fruit flavors in harmonious balance with other characters. Hop flavor is evident over a full range from low to high. Hop bitterness is evident over a full range from low to high. The evolution of natural acidity develops balanced complexity. Horsey, goaty, leathery, phenolic and light to moderate and/or fruity acidic character evolved from Brettanomyces organisms may be evident, not dominant and in balance with other character. Cultured yeast and bacteria strains may be used in the fermentation. Acidity may also be contributed to by bacteria, but may or may not dominate. Moderate to intense yet balanced fruity-ester flavors are evident. Residual flavors that come from liquids previously aged in a barrel such as bourbon or sherry should not be present. Wood vessels may be used during the fermentation and aging process, but wood-derived flavors such as vanillin must not be present. Diacetyl and DMS flavors should not be perceived. Body is evident over a full range from low to high. Wood- and barrel-aged sour ales are classified elsewhere.

  • 3S - American-Style Sour Ale

    Comments

    American-Style Sour Ales are any range of color, and may take on the color of other ingredients. Chill haze, bacteria and yeast-induced haze are allowable at low to medium levels at any temperature. Moderate to intense yet balanced fruity-ester aromas are evident. In darker versions, roasted malt, caramel-like and chocolate-like aromas are subtly present. Diacetyl and DMS aromas should not be perceived. Hop aroma is evident over a full range from low to high. In darker versions, roasted malt, caramel-like and chocolate-like flavors are subtly present. Hop flavor is evident over a full range from low to high. Hop bitterness is evident over a full range from low to high. There is no Brettanomyces character in this style of beer. The evolution of natural acidity develops balanced complexity. The acidity present is usually in the form of lactic, acetic and other organic acids naturally developed with acidified malt in the mash or in fermentation by the use of various microorganisms including certain bacteria and yeasts. Acidic character can be a complex balance of several types of acid and characteristics of age. Moderate to intense yet balanced fruity-ester flavors are evident. Residual flavors that come from liquids previously aged in a barrel such as bourbon or sherry should not be present. Wood vessels may be used during the fermentation and aging process, but wood-derived flavors such as vanillin must not be present. Diacetyl and DMS flavors should not be perceived. Body is evident over a full range from low to high. Fruited versions will exhibit fruit flavors in harmonious balance with other characters. Wood- and barrel-aged sour ales are classified elsewhere.

Category 4 - German Origin Ale Styles

  • 4A - German-Style Kölsch/Köln-Style Kölsch

    Comments

    German-Style Kölsch/Köln-Style Kölschs are straw to gold. Chill haze should be absent. Good, dense head retention is desirable. Fruity-ester aroma should be minimally perceived, if at all. Light pear-apple-Riesling wine- like fruitiness may be apparent, but is not necessary for this style. Hop aroma is low and if evident should express noble hop character. Malt character is a very low to low with soft sweetness. Caramel character should not be evident. Hop flavor is low and if evident should express noble hop character. Hop bitterness is medium. Fruity-ester flavors should be minimally perceived, if at all. Light pear-apple-Riesling wine-like fruitiness may be apparent, but is not necessary for this style. Wheat can be used in brewing this beer. Kölsch is fermented at warmer temperatures compared to typical lager temperatures but at lower temperatures than most English and Belgian ales, then aged at cold temperatures (German ale or alt-style beer). Ale yeast is used for fermentation, though lager yeast is sometimes used in the bottle or final cold conditioning process. Body is light to medium-light; it is slightly dry on the palate, yet crisp.

    Stats

    OG 1.042 — 1.048
    FG 1.006 — 1.01
    ABV 4.8 — 5.3
    IBU 18.0 — 28.0
    SRM 6.0 — 12.0
  • 4B - German-Style Altbier

    Comments

    German-Style Altbiers are copper to dark brown ales, originally from the Düsseldorf area. No chill haze should be perceived. A variety of malts including wheat may be used to produce medium-low to medium malt aroma. Fruity- ester aroma can be low. No diacetyl aroma should be perceived. Hop aroma is low to medium. A variety of malts including wheat may be used to produce medium-low to medium level malty flavor. Hop flavor is low to medium. Hop bitterness is medium to very high (although the 25 to 35 IBU range is more normal for the majority of Altbiers from Düsseldorf). Fruity-ester flavors can be low. No diacetyl should be perceived. The overall impression is clean, crisp, and flavorful often with a dry finish. Body is medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.044 — 1.052
    FG 1.008 — 1.014
    ABV 4.6 — 5.6
    IBU 25.0 — 52.0
    SRM 22.0 — 38.0
  • 4C - Kellerbier (Cellar beer) or Zwickelbier - Ale

    Comments

    Kellerbier (Cellar beer) or Zwickelbier - Ales are the color of the underlying German ale style. Appearance may or may not be clear, so may appear slightly hazy to moderately cloudy. Exhibiting a small amount of yeast haze is acceptable. These beers are unfiltered, but may be naturally clear due to settling of yeast during aging. Head retention may not be optimal. Kellerbier Ales are unfiltered German-style Altbier and Kölsch. Aromas typical of the underlying beer style are present. Yeast aroma is desirable, yet should be low to medium without overpowering the balance and character of malt and hops. Low to moderately low levels of yeast-generated sulfur-containing compounds should be apparent in aroma, and low levels of acetaldehyde or other volatiles normally removed during fermentation may or may not be apparent. Hop aroma is sometimes suppressed by the presence of yeast, depending on style. Malt character will vary with style (see individual style descriptions). Hop flavor is sometimes suppressed by the presence of yeast, depending on style. Hop bitterness is sometimes suppressed by the presence of yeast, depending on style. Yeast flavor is desirable, yet should be low to medium without overpowering the balance and character of malt and hops. Low to moderately low levels of yeast-generated sulfur containing compounds should be apparent in flavor, and low levels of acetaldehyde or other volatiles normally removed during fermentation may or may not be apparent. The sulfur and acetaldehyde characters should contribute positively to the beer drinking experience. These unfiltered German-style ales are packaged and/or served intentionally with low to moderate amounts of yeast. Products may be filtered and again dosed with yeast in the package, manifesting themselves as bottle conditioned beers or unfiltered beer with yeast present. During registration brewers may specify pouring instructions, choosing normal pouring, quiet pouring or intentional rousing of yeast. Entries will be presented during judging as specified by entering brewer. Body is variable with style. The brewer must indicate the classic style on which the entry is based to allow for accurate judging. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during evaluation.

  • 4D - Berliner-Style Weisse (Wheat)

    Comments

    Berliner-Style Weisses (Wheats) are straw to pale, the lightest of all the German wheat beers. May be hazy or cloudy from yeast or chill haze. Fruity-ester aroma will be evident. No diacetyl should be perceived. Hop aroma is not perceived. Malt sweetness is absent. Hop flavor is not perceived. Hop bitterness is not existent to very low. The unique combination of yeast and lactic acid bacteria fermentation yields a beer that is acidic and highly attenuated. Fruity-ester flavors will be evident. No diacetyl should be perceived. Berliners are sometimes served with sweet fruit or herbal syrups. Carbonation is high. Body is very light. At competition, subcategories for unfruited and fruited or flavored versions of the style could be created. For unfruited versions, brewer would indicate that no fruit or flavor has been added. Fruited or flavored entries would be accompanied by a very brief description of the fruit/flavor used by the brewer.

    Stats

    OG 1.028 — 1.032
    FG 1.004 — 1.006
    ABV 2.8 — 3.4
    IBU 3.0 — 6.0
    SRM 4.0 — 8.0
  • 4E - Leipzig-Style Gose

    Comments

    Leipzig-Style Goses are straw to medium amber. Appearance is cloudy/hazy with yeast character, may have evidence of continued fermentation activity. Lemony or other citrus-like aromas are often present. Some versions may have the spicy aroma character of added coriander at low to medium levels. Horsey, leathery or earthy aromas contributed by Brettanomyces yeasts may be evident but have a very low profile, as this beer is not excessively aged. Hop aroma is not perceived. Malt sweetness is not perceived to very low. They typically contain malted barley and unmalted wheat, with some traditional varieties containing oats. Hop flavor is not perceived. Hop bitterness is not perceived. Lemony or other citrus-like flavors are often present. Some versions may have the spicy flavor character of added coriander on the palate at low to medium levels. Salt (table salt) character is also traditional in low amounts. Horsey, leathery or earthy flavors contributed by Brettanomyces yeasts may be evident but have a very low profile, as this beer is not excessively aged. Modern German Gose breweries typically introduce only pure beer yeast strains for fermentation. Traditional examples of Gose are spontaneously fermented, similarly to Belgian- style gueuze/lambic beers, and should exhibit complexity of acidic, flavor and aroma contributed by introduction of wild yeast and bacteria into the fermentation. Low to medium lactic acid character is evident in all examples as sharp, refreshing sourness. A primary difference between Belgian Gueuze and German Gose is that Gose is served at a much younger age. Gose it typically enjoyed fresh and carbonated. Overall complexity of flavors and aromas sought while maintaining a balance between acidity, yeast-enhanced spice and refreshment is ideal. Body is low to medium-low. At competitions, brewers might provide supplemental information such as modern or traditional version, spices used if any and/or information about the brewing process.

    Stats

    OG 1.036 — 1.056
    FG 1.008 — 1.012
    ABV 4.4 — 5.4
    IBU 10.0 — 15.0
    SRM 6.0 — 18.0
  • 4F - South German-Style Hefeweizen/Hefeweissbier

    Comments

    South German-Style Hefeweizen/Hefeweissbiers are straw to amber. Because yeast is present appearance may appropriately be very cloudy. The aroma of a German Hefeweizen is decidedly fruity and phenolic. The phenolic characteristics are often described as clove-like, nutmeg-like, mildly smoke-like or even vanilla-like. Banana-like ester aroma should be present at low to medium-high levels. Hop aroma is not perceived to very low. Malt sweetness is very low to medium-low. Hop flavor is not perceived to very low. Hop bitterness is very low. These beers are made with at least 50 percent malted wheat. No diacetyl should be perceived. The flavor of a Weissbier with yeast is decidedly fruity and phenolic. The phenolic characteristics are often described as clove-like, nutmeg- like, mildly smoke-like or even vanilla-like. Banana-like ester flavor should be present at low to medium-high levels. Hefeweizen is very highly carbonated. Because yeast is present, the beer will have yeast flavor and a characteristically fuller mouthfeel. During registration brewers may specify pouring instructions, choosing normal pouring, quiet pouring or intentional rousing of yeast. Entries will be presented during judging as specified by entering brewer. Body is medium to full.

    Stats

    OG 1.047 — 1.056
    FG 1.008 — 1.016
    ABV 4.9 — 5.6
    IBU 10.0 — 15.0
    SRM 6.0 — 18.0
  • 4G - South German-Style Kristal Weizen/Kristal Weissbier

    Comments

    South German-Style Kristal Weizen/Kristal Weissbiers are straw to amber. Appearance is clear with no chill haze present. Because the beer has been filtered, yeast is not present. The aroma is very similar to Hefeweizen; the phenolic characteristics are often described as clove-like or nutmeg-like and can be smoky or even vanilla-like. Banana-like ester aroma is often present. Hop aroma is not perceived to very low. Malt sweetness is very low to medium-low. Hop flavor is not perceived to very low. Hop bitterness is very low. These beers are made with at least 50 percent malted wheat. No diacetyl should be perceived. The flavor is very similar to Hefeweizen with the caveat that fruity and phenolic characters are not combined with the yeasty flavor and fuller-bodied mouthfeel of yeast. The phenolic characteristics are often described as clove-like or nutmeg-like and can be smoky or even vanilla-like. Banana-like ester flavor is often present. Kristal Weizen is well attenuated and very highly carbonated. The beer will have no flavor of yeast and a cleaner, drier mouthfeel than counterparts served with yeast. Body is medium to full.

    Stats

    OG 1.047 — 1.056
    FG 1.008 — 1.016
    ABV 4.9 — 5.6
    IBU 10.0 — 15.0
    SRM 6.0 — 18.0
  • 4H - German-Style Leichtes Weizen/Weissbier

    Comments

    German-Style Leichtes Weizen/Weissbiers are straw to copper-amber. If served with yeast appearance may appropriately be very cloudy. The phenolic and estery aromas typical of Weissbiers are more subdued in Leichtes Weizen. No diacetyl aroma should be perceived. Hop aroma is not perceived to very low. Malt sweetness is very low to medium-low. Hop flavor is not perceived to very low. Hop bitterness is very low. The phenolic and estery flavors typical of Weissbiers are more subdued in Leichtes Weizen. The overall flavor profile is less complex than Hefeweizen due to decreased alcohol content and there is less yeasty flavor present. No diacetyl should be perceived. The German word leicht means light, and as such these beers are light versions of Hefeweizen. During registration brewers may specify pouring instructions, choosing normal pouring, quiet pouring or intentional rousing of yeast. Entries will be presented during judging as specified by entering brewer. Body is low with diminished mouth feel relative to Hefeweizen.

    Stats

    OG 1.028 — 1.044
    FG 1.004 — 1.008
    ABV 2.5 — 3.5
    IBU 10.0 — 15.0
  • 4I - South German-Style Bernsteinfarbenes Weizen/Weissbier

    Comments

    South German-Style Bernsteinfarbenes Weizen/Weissbiers are amber to light brown; the German word Bernsteinfarben means amber colored. If served with yeast appearance may appropriately be very cloudy. The phenolic and estery aromas typical of Weissbiers are more subdued in Bernsteinfarbenes Weissbier. No diacetyl aroma should be perceived. Hop aroma is not perceived. Distinct sweet maltiness and caramel or bready character from the use of medium colored malts characterizes this beer style. Hop flavor is not perceived. Hop bitterness is low. These beers are made with at least 50 percent malted wheat. The phenolic and estery flavors of this Weissbier should be evident but subdued. Bernsteinfarbenes Weissbier should be well attenuated and very highly carbonated. No diacetyl should be perceived. During registration brewers may specify pouring instructions, choosing normal pouring, quiet pouring or intentional rousing of yeast. Entries will be presented during judging as specified by entering brewer. Body is medium to full.

    Stats

    OG 1.048 — 1.056
    FG 1.008 — 1.016
    ABV 4.8 — 5.4
    IBU 10.0 — 15.0
    SRM 18.0 — 26.0
  • 4J - South German-Style Dunkel Weizen/Dunkel Weissbier

    Comments

    South German-Style Dunkel Weizen/Dunkel Weissbiers are copper-brown to very dark. If served with yeast appearance may appropriately be very cloudy. The phenolic and estery aromas typical of Weissbiers are more subdued in Dunkel Weissbier. No diacetyl aroma should be perceived. Hop aroma is not perceived. Distinct sweet maltiness and a chocolate-like character from roasted malt characterize this beer style. Usually dark barley malts are used in conjunction with dark cara or color malts. Hop flavor is not perceived. Hop bitterness is low. These beers are made with at least 50 percent malted wheat. The phenolic and estery flavors of Dunkel Weissbier should be evident but subdued. Dunkel Weissbier should be well attenuated and very highly carbonated. No diacetyl should be perceived. During registration brewers may specify pouring instructions, choosing normal pouring, quiet pouring or intentional rousing of yeast. Entries will be presented during judging as specified by entering brewer. Body is medium to full.

    Stats

    OG 1.048 — 1.056
    FG 1.008 — 1.016
    ABV 4.8 — 5.4
    IBU 10.0 — 15.0
    SRM 20.0 — 50.0
  • 4K - South German-Style Weizenbock/Weissbock

    Comments

    South German-Style Weizenbock/Weissbocks are gold to very dark. If served with yeast appearance may appropriately be very cloudy. Balanced clove-like phenolic and fruity-estery banana elements produce a well- rounded aroma. If dark, a mild roast malt character should emerge to a lesser degree in the aroma. No diacetyl aroma should be perceived. Hop aroma is not perceived. Medium malty sweetness is present. If dark, a mild roast malt flavor should emerge. Hop flavor is not perceived. Hop bitterness is low. Balanced clove-like phenolic and fruity- estery banana-like elements produce a well-rounded flavor. Carbonation is high. No diacetyl should be perceived. During registration brewers may specify pouring instructions, choosing normal pouring, quiet pouring or intentional rousing of yeast. Entries will be presented during judging as specified by entering brewer. Body is medium to full.

    Stats

    OG 1.066 — 1.08
    FG 1.016 — 1.028
    ABV 7.0 — 9.5
    IBU 15.0 — 35.0
  • 4L - Bamberg-Style Weiss Rauchbier (smoked Helles or Dunkel)

    Comments

    Bamberg-Style Weiss Rauchbiers (smoked Helles or Dunkel) are pale to chestnut brown. Because yeast is present appearance may appropriately be very cloudy. Smoky malt character ranging from low to high should be present in the aroma. The aroma of a Weissbier with yeast is decidedly fruity and phenolic. The phenolic characteristics are often described as clove-like, nutmeg-like, mildly smoke-like or even vanilla-like. Banana-like ester aroma is often present at low to medium-high levels. Hop aroma is not perceived. A detectable degree of roast malt should be present without being robust. Smoky malt flavor ranging from low to high is present. Smoke character is not harshly phenolic, but rather very smooth, almost rendering a perception of mild sweetness. Hop flavor is not perceived. Hop bitterness is low. These beers are made with at least 50 percent malted wheat. No diacetyl should be perceived. The flavor of a Weissbier is decidedly fruity and phenolic. The phenolic characteristics are often described as clove-like or nutmeg-like and can be smoky or even vanilla-like. Banana-like esters are often present. Weissbier is well attenuated and very highly carbonated. Because yeast is present, the beer will have yeast flavor and a characteristically fuller mouthfeel. Body is medium to full.

    Stats

    OG 1.047 — 1.056
    FG 1.008 — 1.016
    ABV 4.9 — 5.6
    IBU 10.0 — 15.0
    SRM 8.0 — 36.0

Category 5 - Belgian And French Origin Ale Styles

  • 5A - Belgian-Style Blonde Ale

    Comments

    Belgian-Style Blonde Ales are pale to light amber. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Malt aroma is low. Low to medium fruity-ester aromas balanced with light malt and spice aromas may be present. Hop aroma is not perceived to low; noble-type hops are commonly used. Malt flavor is low. Hop flavor is not perceived to low. Hop bitterness is very low to low. Overall impression is a beer orchestrated with balanced light sweet, spiced and low to medium fruity-ester flavors. Low yeast-derived phenolic spiciness may be perceived. Diacetyl and acidic character should not be perceived. Body is light to medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.054 — 1.068
    FG 1.008 — 1.014
    ABV 6.3 — 7.9
    IBU 15.0 — 30.0
    SRM 8.0 — 14.0
  • 5B - Belgian-Style Pale Ale

    Comments

    Belgian-Style Pale Ales are gold to copper. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Malt aroma is low. Low to medium fruity-ester aromas are evident. Yeast-derived phenolic spiciness may be perceived. Diacetyl aroma should not be perceived. Hop aroma is low but noticeable; noble-type hops are commonly used. Malt aroma is low. Low caramel or toasted malt flavor is acceptable. Hop flavor is low but noticeable. Hop bitterness is low but noticeable. Low to medium fruity-ester flavors are evident. Low levels of yeast-derived phenolic spicy flavors may be perceived. Diacetyl flavor should not be perceived. Body is light to medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.044 — 1.054
    FG 1.008 — 1.014
    ABV 4.1 — 6.3
    IBU 20.0 — 30.0
    SRM 12.0 — 24.0
  • 5C - Belgian-Style Pale Strong Ale

    Comments

    Belgian-Style Pale Strong Ales are pale to copper. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Hop aroma is medium-low to medium-high. Malt character intensity should be low to medium, often surviving along with a complex fruitiness. Hop flavor is medium-low to medium-high. Hop bitterness is medium-low to medium-high. These beers are often brewed with light colored Belgian "candy" sugar. Very little or no diacetyl should be perceived. Herbs and spices are sometimes used to delicately flavor these strong ales. Low levels of yeast-derived phenolic spiciness may also be perceived. These beers can be malty in overall impression or dry and highly attenuated. They can have a perceptively deceiving high alcoholic character. They can have relatively light body for beers of this alcoholic strength. Some versions may be equally high in alcohol yet more medium in body. Body is very light to medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.064 — 1.096
    FG 1.008 — 1.024
    ABV 7.1 — 11.2
    IBU 20.0 — 50.0
  • 5D - Belgian-Style Dark Strong Ale

    Comments

    Belgian-Style Dark Strong Ales are medium-amber to very dark. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Medium to high malt aroma and complex fruity aromas are distinctive. Very little or no diacetyl aroma should be perceived. Hop aroma is low to medium. Medium to high malt intensity can be rich, creamy, and sweet. Fruity complexity along with soft roasted malt flavor adds distinct character. Hop flavor is low to medium. Hop bitterness is low to medium. These beers are often, though not always, brewed with dark Belgian "candy" sugar. Very little or no diacetyl flavor should be perceived. Herbs and spices are sometimes used to delicately flavor these strong ales. Low levels of phenolic spiciness from yeast byproducts may also be perceived. These beers can be well attenuated, with an alcohol strength which is often deceiving to the senses. Body is medium to full.

    Stats

    OG 1.064 — 1.096
    FG 1.012 — 1.024
    ABV 7.1 — 11.2
    IBU 20.0 — 50.0
    SRM 18.0 — 70.0
  • 5E - Belgian-Style Dubbel

    Comments

    Belgian-Style Dubbels are brown to very dark. Chill haze is acceptable at low serving temperatures. Slight yeast haze is often evident when bottle conditioned. Head retention is dense and mousse-like. Chocolate-like caramel aroma is present. Fruity-ester aromas (especially banana) are appropriate at low levels. Diacetyl aroma should not be perceived. Hop aroma is low if present. Malty sweetness and chocolate-like character is present. Hop flavor is low if present. Hop bitterness is medium-low to medium. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Fruity-ester flavors (especially banana) are appropriate at low levels.

    Stats

    OG 1.06 — 1.075
    FG 1.012 — 1.016
    ABV 6.3 — 7.6
    IBU 20.0 — 30.0
    SRM 32.0 — 72.0
  • 5F - Belgian-Style Tripel

    Comments

    Belgian-Style Tripels are pale to medium-amber. Chill haze is acceptable at low serving temperatures. Traditional tripels are bottle conditioned and may exhibit slight yeast haze, but the yeast should not be intentionally roused. Head retention is dense and mousse-like. A complex, sometimes mild spicy aroma characterizes this style. Clove- like phenolic aroma may be very low. Fruity-ester aromas including banana are also common but not necessary. Hop aroma is low if present. Low sweetness from very pale malts is present. Character from roasted or any dark malts should not be present. Hop flavor is low if present. Hop bitterness is medium to medium-high. Complex sometimes mild spicy flavor characterizes this style. Clove-like phenolic flavor may be evident at very low levels. Fruity-ester flavors including banana are also common but not necessary. Traditional Tripels are often well attenuated. Brewing sugar may be used to lighten the perception of body. Alcohol strength and flavor should be perceived as evident. Hop/malt balance is equalizing. The overall beer flavor may finish sweet, though any sweet finish should be light. Oxidative character if evident in aged tripels should be mild and pleasant. Body is medium.

    Stats

    FG 1.008 — 1.018
    ABV 7.1 — 10.1
    IBU 20.0 — 45.0
    SRM 8.0 — 18.0
  • 5G - Belgian-Style Quadrupel

    Comments

    Belgian-Style Quadrupels are amber to dark brown. Chill haze is acceptable at low serving temperatures. A mousse-like dense, sometimes amber head will top off a properly poured and served quad. Complex fruity aromas reminiscent of raisins, dates, figs, grapes and/or plums emerge, often accompanied with a hint of winy character. Hop aroma is not perceived to very low. Caramel, dark sugar and malty sweet flavors and aromas can be intense, not cloying, while complementing fruitiness. Hop flavor is not perceived to very low. Hop bitterness is low to low- medium. Perception of alcohol can be extreme. Complex fruity flavors reminiscent of raisins, dates, figs, grapes and/or plums emerge, often accompanied with a hint of winy character. Perception of alcohol can be extreme. Clove-like phenolic flavor and aroma should not be evident. Diacetyl and DMS should not be perceived. Quadrupels are well attenuated and are characterized by the immense presence of alcohol and balanced flavor, bitterness and aromas. They are well balanced with savoring/sipping drinkability. Oxidative character if evident in aged examples should be mild and pleasant. Body is full with creamy mouthfeel.

    Stats

    OG 1.084 — 1.12
    FG 1.014 — 1.02
    ABV 9.1 — 14.2
    IBU 25.0 — 50.0
    SRM 16.0 — 40.0
  • 5H - French-Style Bière de Garde

    Comments

    French-Style Bière de Gardes are light amber to chestnut brown/red. Chill haze is acceptable. These beers are often bottle conditioned so slight yeast haze is acceptable. These beers are characterized by a toasted malt aroma. Fruity-ester aromas can be light to medium in intensity. Bière de Garde may have Brettanomyces yeast-derived aromas that are slightly acidic, fruity, horsey, goaty and/or leather-like. Earthy, cellar-like and/or musty aromas are acceptable. Diacetyl aroma should not be perceived. Hop aroma is low to medium, from noble-type hops. These beers are characterized by slight malt sweetness in flavor. Hop flavor is low to medium, from noble-type hops. Hop bitterness is low to medium. Bière de Garde may have Brettanomyces yeast-derived flavors that are slightly acidic, fruity, horsey, goaty and/or leather-like. Flavor of alcohol is evident. Fruity-ester flavors can be light to medium in intensity. Diacetyl flavor should not be perceived. During registration brewers may specify pouring instructions, choosing normal pouring, quiet pouring or intentional rousing of yeast. Entries will be presented during judging as specified by entering brewer. Body is light to medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.06 — 1.08
    FG 1.012 — 1.024
    ABV 4.4 — 8.0
    IBU 20.0 — 30.0
    SRM 14.0 — 32.0
  • 5I - French & Belgian-Style Saison

    Comments

    French & Belgian-Style Saisons are pale to light brown. Chill or slight yeast haze is acceptable. There may be quite a variety of characters within these beers. Malt aroma is low to medium-low. Fruity-ester aromas are medium to high. Earthy, cellar-like and/or musty aromas are okay. Diacetyl aroma should not be perceived. Hop aroma is low to medium. Malt flavor is low but provides foundation for the overall balance. Hop flavor is low to medium. Hop bitterness is medium to medium-high. Complex alcohols, herbs, spices, low Brettanomyces character and even clove and smoke-like phenolics may or may not be evident in the overall balanced beer. Herb and/or spice flavors, including black pepper-like notes, may or may not be evident. Fruitiness from fermentation is generally in character. A balanced small amount of sour or acidic flavors is acceptable when in balance with other components. Diacetyl flavor should not be perceived. These beers are often bottle conditioned with some yeast character and high carbonation. Saison may have Brettanomyces characters that are slightly acidic, fruity, horsey, goaty and/or leather- like. Specialty ingredients (spices, herbs, flowers, fruits, vegetables, fermentable sugars and carbohydrates, special yeasts of all types, wood aging, etc.) may contribute unique and signature character; color, body, malt character, esters, alcohol level and hop character should be in harmony with the general style description. Body is generally light to medium. At competition, specialty ingredient flavored Saisons can be their own categories or subcategories of the main style.

    Stats

    OG 1.055 — 1.08
    FG 1.004 — 1.016
    ABV 4.4 — 8.4
    IBU 20.0 — 40.0
    SRM 8.0 — 28.0
  • 5J - Belgian-Style Flanders Oud Bruin or Oud Red Ale

    Comments

    Belgian-Style Flanders Oud Bruin or Oud Red Ales are copper to very dark. SRM/EBC color values can be misleading because the red spectrum of color is not accurately assessed using these procedures. Chill haze is acceptable at low serving temperatures. Some versions may be more highly carbonated and, when bottle conditioned, may appear cloudy when served. Roasted malt aromas including a cocoa-like character are acceptable at low levels. Brettanomyces produced aromas may be completely absent or very low. Fruity-estery aroma which is often cherry-like is apparent. Hop aroma is not perceived. Roasted malt flavors including a cocoa-like character are acceptable at low levels. A very low degree of malt sweetness may be present and in balance with the acidity produced by Lactobacillus activity. Hop flavor is not perceived. Hop bitterness is perceived to be very low to medium-low, though acidity and wood aging (if used) may mask higher bitterness unit levels. Overall balance is characterized by slight to strong lactic sourness, and with "Reds" sometimes a balanced degree of acetic acid. Brettanomyces produced flavors may be absent or very low. Fruity-estery flavor which is often cherry-like is apparent. Oak-like or woody characters may be pleasantly integrated into overall palate. Bottle conditioned versions are often blended old with new before packaging in order to create the brewer’s intended balance of characters. Body is described as a refreshing mouthfeel.

    Stats

    OG 1.044 — 1.056
    FG 1.008 — 1.016
    ABV 4.8 — 6.6
    IBU 8.0 — 25.0
    SRM 24.0 — 50.0
  • 5K - Belgian-Style White (or Wit)/Belgian-Style Wheat

    Comments

    Belgian-Style White (or Wit)/Belgian-Style Wheats are straw to pale. Unfiltered starch and yeast haze should be part of the appearance. Wits are traditionally bottle conditioned and served cloudy. Coriander and light orange peel aroma should be perceived as such or as an unidentified spiciness. Low to medium fruity-ester aromas are present. Diacetyl aroma should not be perceived. Hop aroma is not perceived. Malt character is very low to low. Hop flavor is not perceived to low. Hop bitterness is low, achieved traditionally by the use of noble-type hops. Wits are spiced with coriander and orange peel. Mild phenolic spiciness and yeast flavors may be evident. Low to medium fruity- ester flavors are present. Mild acidity is appropriate. No diacetyl flavor should be perceived. Wits are brewed using unmalted wheat, sometimes oats and malted barley. During registration brewers may specify pouring instructions, choosing normal pouring, quiet pouring or intentional rousing of yeast. Entries will be presented during judging as specified by entering brewer. Body is low to medium, with a degree of creaminess from wheat starch.

    Stats

    OG 1.044 — 1.05
    FG 1.006 — 1.01
    ABV 4.8 — 5.6
    IBU 10.0 — 17.0
    SRM 4.0 — 8.0
  • 5L - Belgian-Style Lambic

    Comments

    Belgian-Style Lambics are gold to medium-amber. Cloudiness is acceptable. Characteristic horsey, goaty, leathery and phenolic aromas evolved from Brettanomyces yeast are often present at moderate levels. High to very high fruity-ester aromas are present. Hop aroma is not perceived to very low, and can include cheesy or floral lavender- like character. Hop character is achieved by using stale and aged hops at low rates. Lambics are brewed with unmalted wheat and malted barley. Sweet malt characters are not perceived. Hop flavor is not perceived to very low. Hop bitterness is very low. Traditionally Lambics are unblended, naturally and spontaneously fermented, with high to very high levels of fruity esters, bacterial and yeast derived sourness, that sometimes but not necessarily includes acetic flavors. Characteristic horsey, goaty, leathery and phenolic flavors evolved from Brettanomyces yeast are often present at moderate levels. Some modern versions are fermented with the addition of cultured yeast and bacteria. Carbonation can range from low to high. Vanillin and other wood-derived flavors should not be evident. Lambics originating in the Brussels area are often simply called lambic. Versions of this beer style made outside of the Brussels area of Belgium cannot be called true lambics. These versions are said to be "Belgian-Style Lambic" and may be made to resemble many of the beers of true origin. Historically, traditional lambic is dry and completely attenuated, exhibiting no residual sweetness either from malt, sugar or artificial sweeteners. Sweet versions may be created through addition of sugars or artificial sweeteners. Body is very light with dry mouthfeel. Competition organizers may choose to subcategorize this style into A) Traditional and B) Sweet.

    Stats

    OG 1.047 — 1.056
    FG 1.0 — 1.01
    ABV 6.3 — 8.2
    IBU 9.0 — 23.0
    SRM 12.0 — 26.0
  • 5M - Belgian-Style Gueuze Lambic

    Comments

    Belgian-Style Gueuze Lambics are gold to medium-amber. Cloudiness is acceptable, as Gueuze is always refermented in the bottle. Gueuze is characterized by intense fruity-estery, sour, and acidic aromas. Diacetyl aroma should be absent. Characteristic horsey, goaty, leathery and phenolic aromas evolved from Brettanomyces yeast are often present at moderate levels. Hop aroma is not perceived to very low. Gueuze is brewed with unmalted wheat, malted barley, and stale, aged hops. Sweet malt characters are not perceived. Hop flavor is not perceived. Hop bitterness is very low. Old lambic is blended with newly fermenting young lambic to create this special style of lambic. These unflavored blended and secondary fermented lambic beers may be very dry or mildly sweet and are characterized by intense fruity-estery, sour, and acidic flavors. Diacetyl should be absent. Characteristic horsey, goaty, leathery and phenolic flavors evolved from Brettanomyces yeast are often present at moderate levels. Vanillin and other wood-derived flavors should not be evident. Gueuze Lambics whose origin is the Brussels area are often simply called gueuze lambic. Versions of this beer style made outside of the Brussels area of Belgium are said to be "Belgian-Style Gueuze Lambics." The Belgian-style versions are made to resemble many of the beers of true origin. Historically, traditional gueuze lambics are dry and completely attenuated, exhibiting no residual sweetness either from malt, sugar or artificial sweeteners. Some versions often have a degree of sweetness, contributed by sugars or artificial sweeteners. See also Belgian-Style Lambic for additional background information. Body is very light with dry mouthfeel. Competition organizers may choose to subcategorize this style into A) Traditional and B) Sweet.

    Stats

    OG 1.044 — 1.056
    FG 1.0 — 1.01
    ABV 7.0 — 8.9
    IBU 11.0 — 23.0
    SRM 12.0 — 26.0
  • 5N - Belgian-Style Fruit Lambic

    Comments

    Belgian-Style Fruit Lambics are hued with color reflecting the choice of fruit. Cloudiness is acceptable. These beers, also known by the names framboise, kriek, peche, cassis, etc., are characterized by fruit aromas. Characteristic horsey, goaty, leathery and phenolic aromas evolved from Brettanomyces yeast are often present at moderate levels. Hop aroma is not perceived. Malt sweetness is absent, but sweetness of fruit may be low to high. Hop flavor is not perceived. Hop bitterness is very low. Fruit lambics are characterized by fruit flavors. Sourness is an important part of the flavor profile, though sweetness may compromise the intensity. These flavored lambic beers may be very dry or mildly sweet. Characteristic horsey, goaty, leathery and phenolic flavors evolved from Brettanomyces yeast are often present at moderate levels. Vanillin and other woody flavors should not be evident. Fruit Lambics whose origin is the Brussels area are often simply called fruit lambic. Versions of this beer style made outside of the Brussels area of Belgium are said to be "Belgian-Style Fruit Lambics." The Belgian-style versions are made to resemble many of the beers of true origin. Historically, traditional lambics are dry and completely attenuated, exhibiting no residual sweetness either from malt, sugar, fruit or artificial sweeteners. Some versions often have a degree of sweetness, contributed by fruit sugars, other sugars or artificial sweeteners. See also Belgian- Style Lambic for additional background information. Body is dry to full. Competition organizers may choose to subcategorize this style into A) Traditional and B) Sweet.

    Stats

    OG 1.04 — 1.072
    FG 1.008 — 1.016
    ABV 5.7 — 8.9
    IBU 15.0 — 21.0
  • 5O - Other Belgian-Style Ale

    Comments

    Other Belgian-Style Ales are of varying color. Hop aroma may vary depending on style. Recognizing the uniqueness and traditions of several other styles of Belgian ales, the beers entered in this category will be assessed on the merits that they do not fit existing style guidelines, and information that the brewer provides explaining the history and tradition of the style. Balance of character is a key component when assessing these beers. Barrel or wood-aged entries in competitions may be directed to other categories by competition director. In competitions the brewer must provide the historical or regional tradition of the style, or his interpretation of the style, in order to be assessed properly by the judges.

  • 5P - Belgian-Style Table Beer

    Comments

    Belgian-Style Table Beers are gold to black, with caramel color sometimes added to adjust color. Spices (such as orange and lemon peel, as well as coriander) may be added for barely perceptible aroma, but this is not common. Diacetyl aroma should not be perceived. Hop aroma is not perceived to very low. Mild malt character could be evident. These beers may contain malted barley, wheat and rye, as well as unmalted wheat, rye, oats and corn. Hop flavor is very low to low. Hop bitterness is very low to low. Spices (such as orange and lemon peel, as well as coriander) may be added in amounts barely perceptible for flavor, but this is not common. Diacetyl flavor should not be perceived. Traditional versions do not use artificial sweeteners nor are they excessively sweet. More modern versions of this beer can incorporate sweeteners such as sugar and saccharine added post fermentation to sweeten the palate and add to perception of smoothness. The mouth feel is light to moderate, though higher than one might anticipate, usually because of unfermented sugars/malt sugars. Body is light with relatively low carbonation and aftertaste. Competition directors may choose to break out subcategories of Traditional and Modern.

    Stats

    OG 1.008 — 1.038
    FG 1.004 — 1.034
    ABV 0.5 — 3.5
    IBU 5.0 — 15.0
    SRM 10.0 — 100.0

Category 6 - Other Origin Ale Styles

  • 6A - Grodziskie

    Comments

    Grodziskies are straw to golden colored. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Aroma is dominated by oak smoke notes. Fruity-ester aroma can be low. Diacetyl and DMS aromas should not be perceived. Hop aroma is not perceived to very low European noble hop aroma notes. Distinctive character comes from 100% oak wood smoked wheat malt. Overall balance is a sessionably medium to medium-high assertively oak-smoky malt emphasized beer. Hop flavor is very low to low European noble hop flavor notes. Hop bitterness is medium-low to medium clean hop bitterness. Ale fermentation temperatures are managed to lend a crisp overall flavor impression. Low fruity-ester flavor may be present. Sourness, diacetyl, and DMS should not be perceived on the palate. Grodziskie (also known as Grätzer) is a Polish ale style. Historic versions were most often bottle conditioned to relatively high carbonation levels. Body is low to medium low.

    Stats

    OG 1.028 — 1.036
    FG 1.006 — 1.01
    ABV 2.7 — 3.7
    IBU 15.0 — 25.0
    SRM 6.0 — 12.0
  • 6B - Adambier

    Comments

    Adambiers are light brown to very dark. Toast and caramel-like malt aroma may be evident. Hop aroma is low. Astringency of highly roasted malt should be absent. Toast and caramel-like malt flavors may be evident. Hop flavor is low. Hop bitterness is low to medium. Adambier may or may not use wheat in its formulation. Traditional and non-hybrid varieties of European hops were traditionally used. A Kölsch-like ale fermentation is typical. Extensive aging and acidification of this beer can mask malt and hop character to varying degrees. Aging in barrels may contribute some level of Brettanomyces and lactic character. The style originated in Dortmund, and is a strong, dark, hoppy sour ale extensively aged in wood barrels. Traditional versions may have a low or medium low degree of smokiness. Smoke character may be absent in contemporary versions. Body is medium to full.

    Stats

    OG 1.07 — 1.09
    FG 1.01 — 1.02
    ABV 9.0 — 11.0
    IBU 30.0 — 50.0
    SRM 30.0 — 70.0
  • 6C - Dutch-Style Kuit (Kuyt, Koyt)

    Comments

    Dutch-Style Kuits (Kuyt, Koyt) are gold to copper colored ale. Chill haze and other haze is allowable. The overall aroma character of this beer is grain emphasized with a grainy-bready accent. Hop aroma is very low to low from noble hops or other traditional European varieties. The distinctive character comes from use of minimum 45% oat malt, minimum 20% wheat malt and the remainder pale malt. Hop flavor is similar to aroma very low to low from noble or other traditional European varieties. Hop bitterness is medium-low to medium in perceived intensity. Esters may be present at low levels. Very low levels of diacetyl are acceptable. Acidity and sweet corn-like DMS (dimethylsulfide) should not be perceived. This style of beer was popular in the Netherlands from 1400-1550. Body is low to medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.05 — 1.08
    FG 1.006 — 1.015
    ABV 7.9 — 4.7
    IBU 25.0 — 35.0
  • 6D - Australian-Style Pale Ale

    Comments

    Australian-Style Pale Ales are light amber to light brown. Chill or hop haze may be evident. Hop aroma is often reminiscent of tropical fruit such as mango, passion fruit and other tropical fruit character. Intensity can be low to medium-high. Malt character has a perceived low to medium caramel-candy sweetness. Hop flavor is aligned with aroma; tropical fruit such as mango, passion fruit and other tropical fruit character. Intensity can be low to medium- high. Hop bitterness is low to medium. Fruity-ester aroma should be perceived. Diacetyl should be very low if present. DMS aroma should not be present. Body is low to medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.04 — 1.052
    FG 1.004 — 1.008
    ABV 4.2 — 6.2
    IBU 20.0 — 40.0
    SRM 10.0 — 28.0
  • 6E - International-Style Pale Ale

    Comments

    International-Style Pale Ales are gold to light brown. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Low caramel malt aroma is allowed. Hop aroma is absent to high. Very low to medium maltiness is present. Low caramel malt flavor is allowable. Hop flavor is very low to high, highlighted by a wide range of hop characters unlike those typical of fruity, floral, citrus-like or other American-variety characters, tropical fruity Australian varieties and/or earthy, herbal English-varieties. Hop bitterness is medium to high. Fruity-ester flavor and aroma should be low to high. Diacetyl should be absent or present at very low levels. DMS should not be present. Body is light to medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.04 — 1.06
    FG 1.006 — 1.014
    ABV 4.4 — 6.6
    IBU 20.0 — 42.0
    SRM 10.0 — 28.0

Category 7 - European Germanic Origin Lager Styles

  • 7A - German-Style Pilsener

    Comments

    German-Style Pilseners are straw to pale. There should be no chill haze. The head should be dense, rich, perfectly white, very stable and show a good cling. A malty residual sweet aroma can be perceived. Very low levels of DMS aroma, usually below most beer drinkers’ taste thresholds and not detectable except to the trained or sensitive palate, may be present. Other fermentation- or hop-derived sulfur aromas when perceived at low levels may be characteristic of this style. Fruity-ester aromas and diacetyl aroma should not be perceived. Hop aroma is moderate and quite obvious, deriving from late hopping (not dry hopping) noble-type hops. A malty residual sweet flavor can be perceived. Hop flavor is moderate and quite obvious, deriving from late hopping (not dry hopping) noble-type hops. Hop bitterness is medium to high. Similarly very low levels of DMS flavor, usually not detectable to all but well trained palates, may be present. Low levels of other fermentation- or hop-derived sulfur flavors, may be characteristic of this style. Fruity-ester flavors and diacetyl should not be perceived. These are well attenuated beers. Body is medium-light.

    Stats

    OG 1.044 — 1.055
    FG 1.006 — 1.012
    ABV 4.6 — 5.3
    IBU 25.0 — 40.0
    SRM 6.0 — 8.0
  • 7B - Bohemian-Style Pilsener

    Comments

    Bohemian-Style Pilseners are straw to light amber. There should be no chill haze. Its head should be dense and rich. A toasted, biscuit-like, bready malt aroma with low levels of fermented malt derived sulfur compounds may be evident. Very low diacetyl and DMS aromas, if perceived, are characteristic of this style and both may accent malt aroma. Hop aroma is low to medium-low, deriving from noble-type hops. Slightly sweet malt character is evident. Toasted, biscuit-like, and/or bready malt flavors along with low levels of fermented malt derived sulfur compounds may be evident. Hop flavor is low to medium-low, deriving from noble-type hops. Hop bitterness is medium. Very low levels of diacetyl and DMS flavors, if perceived, are characteristic of this style. Body is medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.044 — 1.056
    FG 1.014 — 1.02
    ABV 4.1 — 5.1
    IBU 30.0 — 45.0
    SRM 6.0 — 14.0
  • 7C - Münchner (Munich)-Style Helles

    Comments

    Münchner (Munich)-Style Helless are pale to golden. There should be no chill haze. This is a malt aroma and flavor emphasized beer style. Malt aromas and flavors are often balanced with low levels of yeast-produced sulfur aromas and flavors. Malt character is sometimes bread-like yet always reminiscent of freshly and very lightly toasted malted barley. There should not be any caramel character. Hop aroma is not perceived to low. Hop flavor is very low to low, deriving from European noble-type hops, with hop flavor not implying hop bitterness. Hop bitterness is low, deriving from European noble-type hops. Fruity-ester aromas and flavors should not be perceived. Diacetyl aroma and flavor should not be perceived. Body is medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.044 — 1.05
    FG 1.008 — 1.012
    ABV 4.8 — 5.6
    IBU 18.0 — 25.0
  • 7D - Dortmunder/European-Style Export

    Comments

    Dortmunder/European-Style Exports are straw to deep golden. Chill haze should not be perceived. Fruity-ester and diacetyl aromas should not be perceived. Hop aroma is very low to low, deriving from noble-type hops. Sweet malt flavor can be low and should not be caramel-like. Hop flavor is very low to low, deriving from noble-type hops. Hop bitterness is medium. Fruity-ester flavors and diacetyl should not be perceived. Body is medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.048 — 1.056
    FG 1.01 — 1.014
    ABV 5.1 — 6.1
    IBU 23.0 — 29.0
    SRM 6.0 — 12.0
  • 7E - Vienna-Style Lager

    Comments

    Vienna-Style Lagers are copper to reddish brown. Chill haze should not be perceived. Viennas are characterized by malty aroma, which should have a notable degree of toasted and/or slightly roasted malt character. Hop aroma is very low to low, deriving from noble-type hops. They are also characterized by slight malt sweetness, which should have notable toasted and/or slightly roasted malt character. Hop flavor is very low to low, deriving from noble-type hops. Hop bitterness is low to medium-low, clean and crisp. DMS, diacetyl, and ale-like fruity esters should not be perceived. Body is medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.046 — 1.056
    FG 1.012 — 1.018
    ABV 4.8 — 5.4
    IBU 22.0 — 28.0
    SRM 24.0 — 52.0
  • 7F - German-Style Märzen

    Comments

    German-Style Märzens are pale to reddish brown. Chill haze should not be perceived. Bread or biscuit-like malt aroma is acceptable. Fruity-ester and diacetyl aromas should not be perceived. Hop aroma is low. Sweet maltiness is medium low to medium and dominates over clean hop bitterness. Malt flavors should be light-toasted rather than strongly caramel; low level caramel character is acceptable. Bread or biscuit-like malt flavor is acceptable. Hop flavor is low. Hop bitterness is medium low to medium. Fruity-ester flavors and diacetyl should not be perceived.

    Stats

    OG 1.05 — 1.06
    FG 1.012 — 1.02
    ABV 5.1 — 6.0
    IBU 18.0 — 25.0
    SRM 8.0 — 30.0
  • 7G - German-Style Oktoberfest/Wiesn

    Comments

    German-Style Oktoberfest/Wiesns are straw to golden. Chill haze should not be perceived. Fruity-ester and diacetyl aromas should not be perceived. Hop aroma is very low to low. Sweet maltiness is low. Hop flavor is very low to low. Hop bitterness is very low to low, clean and equalizing the low sweet maltiness. Fruity-ester flavors and diacetyl should not be perceived. Today's Oktoberfest beers are similar or equal to Dortmunder/European-Style Export. Body is medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.048 — 1.056
    FG 1.01 — 1.014
    ABV 5.1 — 6.1
    IBU 23.0 — 29.0
    SRM 6.0 — 10.0
  • 7H - European-Style Dark/Münchner Dunkel

    Comments

    European-Style Dark/Münchner Dunkels are light brown to dark brown. Chill haze should not be perceived. Malt aroma is low to medium, with chocolate-like, roast malt, bread-like or biscuit-like aromas from the use of Munich dark malt. Fruity-ester and diacetyl aromas should not be perceived. Hop aroma is very low to low, deriving from noble-type hops. Chocolate or roast malts can be used, but the percentage used should be minimal. Hop flavor is very low to low, deriving from noble-type hops. Hop bitterness is medium-low to medium. Dunkels do not offer an overly sweet impression, but rather a mild balance between malt sweetness and hop character. Fruity-ester and diacetyl flavors should not be perceived. Body is low to medium-low.

    Stats

    OG 1.048 — 1.056
    FG 1.014 — 1.018
    ABV 4.8 — 5.3
    IBU 16.0 — 25.0
    SRM 30.0 — 40.0
  • 7I - German-Style Schwarzbier

    Comments

    German-Style Schwarzbiers are very dark brown to black, with a surprisingly pale colored head (not excessively brown) with good cling quality. Medium malt aroma includes a mild roasted malt character. Fruity-ester and diacetyl aromas should not be perceived. Hop aroma is very low to low, deriving from noble-type hops. Malt sweetness is low to medium, and incorporates mild roasted malt character without the associated bitterness. Hop flavor is very low to low, deriving from noble-type hops. Hop bitterness is low to medium. Fruity-ester flavors and diacetyl should not be perceived. Body is medium-low to medium, not full bodied.

    Stats

    OG 1.044 — 1.052
    FG 1.01 — 1.016
    ABV 3.8 — 4.9
    IBU 22.0 — 30.0
    SRM 50.0 — 60.0
  • 7J - European Low-Alcohol Lager/German Leicht(bier)

    Comments

    European Low-Alcohol Lager/German Leichtbiers are straw to pale. Chill haze is not acceptable. Fruity-ester and diacetyl aromas should not be perceived. Hop aroma is low to medium. Malt sweetness perceived at low to medium levels. Hop flavor is low to medium. Hop bitterness is medium. These beers should be clean. Fruity-ester flavors and diacetyl should not be perceived. Very low levels of sulfur related compounds are acceptable. Body is very light.

    Stats

    OG 1.026 — 1.034
    FG 1.006 — 1.01
    ABV 2.5 — 3.7
    IBU 16.0 — 24.0
    SRM 4.0 — 8.0
  • 7K - Bamberg-Style Helles Rauchbier

    Comments

    Bamberg-Style Helles Rauchbiers are light pale to golden. Chill haze should not be perceived. This is a malt- emphasized beer, with malt aromas reminiscent of freshly and very lightly toasted sweet malted barley present. Beech wood smoky malt character ranging from very low to medium should be present in the aroma. Smoke aroma characters are not harshly phenolic, but rather very smooth. Malt aromas are often balanced with low level character of yeast produced sulfur compounds. Caramel aroma should not be present. Fruity-ester and diacetyl aromas should not be perceived. Hop aroma is very low to low, deriving from noble-type hops. Malt flavors reminiscent of freshly and very lightly toasted sweet malted barley is present. Beech wood smoky malt flavors ranging from very low to medium should be present. Smoke character is not harshly phenolic, but rather very smooth, almost rendering a perception of mild sweetness to this style of beer. Malt flavors are often balanced with low level character of yeast produced sulfur compounds. Caramel flavor should not be present. Hop flavor is very low to low, deriving from noble-type hops, with hop flavor not implying hop bitterness. Hop bitterness is low to medium. Fruity-ester and diacetyl flavors should not be perceived. Body is medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.044 — 1.05
    FG 1.008 — 1.012
    ABV 4.8 — 5.6
    IBU 18.0 — 25.0
  • 7L - Bamberg-Style Märzen Rauchbier

    Comments

    Bamberg-Style Märzen Rauchbiers are pale to light brown. Chill haze should not be perceived. Aroma should strike a balance between malt, hop and smoke. Sweet toasted malt aroma is present. Beech wood smoky malt character ranging from very low to medium should be present in the aroma. Smoke aroma characters are neither harshly phenolic nor acrid, but rather very smooth. Fruity-ester and diacetyl aromas should not be perceived. Hop aroma is very low to low, deriving from noble-type hops. Medium-low to medium toasted malt sweetness is present. Very low to medium beech wood smoky malt flavors are very smooth, not harshly phenolic or acrid. Hop flavor is very low to low, deriving from noble-type hops. Hop bitterness is low to medium. Fruity-ester and diacetyl flavors should not be perceived. Body is full.

    Stats

    OG 1.05 — 1.06
    FG 1.012 — 1.02
    ABV 5.1 — 6.0
    IBU 18.0 — 25.0
    SRM 8.0 — 30.0
  • 7M - Bamberg-Style Bock Rauchbier

    Comments

    Bamberg-Style Bock Rauchbiers are dark brown to very dark. Chill haze should not be perceived. Medium to medium-high malt aroma is present, with very low to medium-high beech wood smoky aromas. Smoke character is not harshly phenolic, but rather very smooth. Fruity-ester aromas should be minimal if present. Diacetyl aroma should not be perceived. Hop aroma is very low. Medium to medium-high malt flavor is present, with very low to medium-high beech wood smoky characters. Smoke flavor is not harshly phenolic, but rather very smooth, almost rendering a perception of mild sweetness. Hop flavor is low. Hop bitterness is perceived as medium, increasing proportionately with starting gravity. Fruity-ester flavors should be minimal if present. Diacetyl flavor should not be perceived. Body is medium to full.

    Stats

    OG 1.066 — 1.074
    FG 1.018 — 1.024
    ABV 6.3 — 7.6
    IBU 20.0 — 30.0
    SRM 40.0 — 60.0
  • 7N - German-Style Heller Bock/Maibock

    Comments

    German-Style Heller Bock/Maibocks are pale to light amber. The German word helle means light colored, and as such a Heller Bock is relatively pale. Chill haze should not be perceived. Malty aroma as a lightly toasted and/or bready aroma is often evident. Roast or heavy toast/caramel malt aromas should be absent. Fruity-ester aromas may be low if present. Diacetyl aroma should not be perceived. Hop aroma is low to medium-low, deriving from noble- type hops. Sweet malty character as a lightly toasted and/or bready malt character is often evident. Roast or heavy toast/caramel malt flavors should be absent. Hop flavor is low to medium-low, deriving from noble-type hops. Hop bitterness is low. Fruity-ester flavors may be low if present. Diacetyl should be absent. Body is medium to full.

    Stats

    OG 1.066 — 1.074
    FG 1.012 — 1.02
    ABV 6.3 — 8.1
    IBU 20.0 — 38.0
    SRM 8.0 — 18.0
  • 7O - Traditional German-Style Bock

    Comments

    Traditional German-Style Bocks are dark brown to very dark. Traditional bocks are made with all malt, and have high malt character with aromas of toasted or nut-like malt, but not caramel. Fruity-ester aromas should be minimal if present. Diacetyl aroma should not be perceived. Hop aroma is very low. Traditional bocks have high malt sweetness. Malt flavor character should be a balance of sweetness and toasted or nut-like malt, but not caramel. Hop flavor is low. Hop bitterness is perceived as medium, increasing proportionately with starting gravity. Fruity-ester flavors should be minimal if present. Diacetyl flavor should be absent. Body is medium to full.

    Stats

    OG 1.066 — 1.074
    FG 1.018 — 1.024
    ABV 6.3 — 7.6
    IBU 20.0 — 30.0
    SRM 40.0 — 60.0
  • 7P - German-Style Doppelbock

    Comments

    German-Style Doppelbocks are copper to dark brown. Dominant malt aromas are reminiscent of fresh and lightly toasted Munich-style malt, more so than caramel or toffee malt character. Some elements of caramel and toffee can be evident in aroma and contribute to complexity, but the predominant malt aroma is an expression of toasted barley malt. Hop aroma is absent. Malty sweetness is dominant but should not be cloying. Malt flavor character is primarily fresh and lightly toasted Munich-style malt, more so than caramel or toffee malt character. Some elements of caramel and toffee can be evident, but predominant malt character is toasted barley malt. Astringency from roast malts is absent. Hop flavor is perceived as low. Hop bitterness is perceived as low. Alcoholic strength is high. Fruity-ester flavors are commonly perceived but at low to moderate levels. Diacetyl should be absent. Body is full.

    Stats

    OG 1.074 — 1.08
    FG 1.014 — 1.02
    ABV 6.6 — 7.9
    IBU 17.0 — 27.0
    SRM 24.0 — 60.0
  • 7Q - German-Style Eisbock

    Comments

    German-Style Eisbocks are dark brown to black. Alcohol may be perceived in aroma. Fruity-ester aromas may be evident but not overpowering. Diacetyl aroma should be absent. Hop aroma is absent. Sweet malt character is very high. Hop flavor is absent. Hop bitterness is very low to low. This is a stronger version of Doppelbock. Typically these beers are brewed by freezing a Doppelbock and removing resulting ice to increase alcohol content. Fruity-ester flavors may be evident but not overpowering. Diacetyl flavor should be absent. Alcoholic strength is very high. Body is very full.

    Stats

    OG 1.074 — 1.116
    ABV 8.6 — 14.3
    IBU 26.0 — 33.0
    SRM 36.0 — 100.0
  • 7R - Kellerbier (Cellar beer) or Zwickelbier - Lager

    Comments

    Kellerbier (Cellar beer) or Zwickelbier - Lagers are the color of the underlying German lager style. Appearance may or may not be clear, so may appear slightly hazy to moderately cloudy. Exhibiting a small amount of yeast haze is acceptable. These beers are unfiltered, but may be naturally clear due to settling of yeast during aging. Head retention may not be optimal. Kellerbier Lagers are unfiltered lagered versions of Germanic lager beer styles such as Münchner Helles and Dunkel, Dortmunder/ Export, Bohemian Pilsener and German Pilsener. Aromas typical of the underlying beer style are present. Low to medium levels of yeast-generated sulfur aromas should be apparent in aroma. Low levels of acetaldehyde or other volatiles normally scrubbed during fermentation may or may not be apparent. Subtle or low fruity-ester aromas may be apparent. Diacetyl aroma should be absent. Hop aroma is variable with style, with dry hopped characters acceptable. Malt character will vary with style (see individual style descriptions). Hop flavor is variable with style, with dry hopped characters acceptable. Hop bitterness is variable with style. Kellerbier Lagers have low to medium carbonation. Subtle or low fruity-esters flavors may be apparent. Low to medium levels of yeast-generated sulfur flavors should be apparent, and low levels of acetaldehyde or other volatiles normally scrubbed during fermentation may or may not be apparent. Diacetyl should be absent. The sulfur and acetaldehyde characters should contribute positively to the beer drinking experience. These unfiltered German lager styles are packaged and/or served intentionally with low to moderate amounts of yeast. Products may be filtered and again dosed with yeast in the package, manifesting themselves as bottle conditioned beers or unfiltered beer with yeast present. During registration brewers may specify pouring instructions, choosing normal pouring, quiet pouring or intentional rousing of yeast. Entries will be presented during judging as specified by entering brewer. Body is variable with style. The brewer must indicate the classic style on which the entry is based to allow for accurate judging. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during evaluation.

Category 8 - North American Origin Lager Styles

  • 8A - American-Style Lager

    Comments

    American-Style Lagers are straw to gold. Chill haze should not be perceived. Light fruity-ester aroma is acceptable. Hop aroma is not perceived to very low. Malt sweetness is very low to low. Hop flavor is not perceived to very low. Hop bitterness is not perceived to very low. Corn, rice, or other grain or sugar adjuncts often used. American Lagers are very clean and crisp, and aggressively carbonated. Light fruity-ester flavor is acceptable. Diacetyl should be absent. Body is light.

    Stats

    OG 1.04 — 1.048
    FG 1.006 — 1.014
    ABV 4.1 — 5.1
    IBU 5.0 — 15.0
    SRM 4.0 — 12.0
  • 8B - American-Style Light (Low Calorie) & Low Carbohydrate Lager

    Comments

    American-Style Light (Low Calorie) & Low Carbohydrate Lagers are very light to pale. Chill haze should not be perceived. Aromas typically related to beer are very low. Light fruity-ester aromas are acceptable. Diacetyl aroma should be absent. Hop aroma is absent to very low. Hop flavor is absent to very low. Hop bitterness is absent to very low. Corn, rice, or other grain or sugar adjuncts often used. These beers are high in carbonation. Flavors typically related to beer are very low. Light fruity ester flavors are acceptable. Diacetyl flavor should be absent. Calorie level should not exceed 125 per 12 ounce serving. Low carb beers should have a maximum carbohydrate level of 3.0 gm per 12 oz. (356 ml). These beers are characterized by extremely high degree of attenuation; often final gravity is less than 1.000 (0 ºPlato). Body is light with dry mouthfeel.

    Stats

    OG 1.024 — 1.04
    ABV 3.5 — 4.4
    IBU 4.0 — 10.0
  • 8C - American-Style Amber (Low Calorie) Lager

    Comments

    American-Style Amber (Low Calorie) Lagers are pale to medium-amber. Chill haze should not be perceived. Light fruity-ester aromas are acceptable. Diacetyl aroma should be absent. Hop aroma is absent or low. Malt sweetness is very low but evident. Hop flavor is absent or very low. Hop bitterness is very low to low. Corn, rice, or other grain or sugar adjuncts may be used but all-malt formulations are also made. These beers are high in carbonation. Light fruity-ester flavors are acceptable. Diacetyl flavor should be absent. Calorie level should not exceed 125 per 12 ounce serving. Body is light to medium-light.

    Stats

    OG 1.024 — 1.04
    FG 1.002 — 1.008
    ABV 3.5 — 4.4
    IBU 8.0 — 15.0
    SRM 8.0 — 24.0
  • 8D - American-Style Pilsener

    Comments

    American-Style Pilseners are straw to gold. There should be no chill haze. This style represents the classic and unique pre-Prohibition American-style pilsener. Medium-low to medium malt aroma is present. DMS, fruity-ester and diacetyl aromas are not acceptable. Hop aroma is medium to high, preferably deriving from noble-type hops. American-type hop-derived citrus aromas should not be present. Up to 25% corn and/or rice in the grist should be used. Medium-low to medium malt flavor is present. Hop flavor is medium to high, preferably deriving from noble- type hops. American-type hop-derived citrus flavors should not be present. Hop bitterness is medium to high. DMS, fruity-ester and diacetyl flavors are not acceptable. Body is light-medium to medium. Competition organizers may wish to subcategorize this style into rice and corn subcategories.

    Stats

    OG 1.045 — 1.06
    FG 1.012 — 1.018
    ABV 4.9 — 6.0
    IBU 25.0 — 40.0
    SRM 6.0 — 12.0
  • 8E - American-Style Ice Lager

    Comments

    American-Style Ice Lagers are very pale to golden. Chill haze is absent. Fruity-ester and diacetyl aromas should not be perceived. Hop aroma is low. Low residual malt sweetness is present. Hop flavor is low. Hop bitterness is low but certainly perceptible. This style is slightly higher in alcohol than most other light-colored, American-style lagers. It has few or no adjuncts. Typically these beers are chilled before filtration so that ice crystals (which may or may not be removed) are formed. This process can contribute to a higher alcohol content (up to 0.5% more). Fruity- ester and diacetyl flavors should not be perceived. Body is low to medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.04 — 1.06
    FG 1.006 — 1.014
    ABV 4.8 — 6.3
    IBU 7.0 — 20.0
    SRM 4.0 — 16.0
  • 8F - American-Style Malt Liquor

    Comments

    American-Style Malt Liquors are straw to gold. Chill haze is absent. Fruity-ester and complex alcohol aromas (though not solvent-like) are acceptable at low levels. Diacetyl aroma should not be perceived. Hop aroma is not perceived. Some residual sweetness is perceived. Hop flavor is not perceived. Hop bitterness is very low. High in starting gravity and alcoholic strength, this style is somewhat diverse. Some malt liquors are just slightly stronger than American lagers, while others approach bock strength. Fruity-ester and complex alcohol (though not solvent- like) flavors are acceptable at low levels. Diacetyl flavor should not be perceived. Body is low to medium-low.

    Stats

    OG 1.05 — 1.06
    FG 1.004 — 1.01
    ABV 6.3 — 7.6
    IBU 12.0 — 23.0
    SRM 4.0 — 10.0
  • 8G - American-Style Amber Lager

    Comments

    American-Style Amber Lagers are gold to copper. Chill haze should not be perceived. Low to medium-low caramel-type or toasted malt aromas are often present. Fruity-ester and diacetyl aromas should be absent. Hop aroma is very low to medium-high. Low to medium-low caramel-type or toasted malt flavors are present. Hop flavor is very low to medium-high. Hop bitterness is very low to medium-high. Fruity-ester and diacetyl flavors should be absent. Body is medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.042 — 1.056
    FG 1.01 — 1.018
    ABV 4.8 — 5.4
    IBU 18.0 — 30.0
    SRM 12.0 — 28.0
  • 8H - American-Style Märzen/Oktoberfest

    Comments

    American-Style Märzen/Oktoberfests are pale to reddish brown. Chill haze should not be perceived. Malt aroma should be light-toasted rather than strongly caramel, though a low level of light caramel character is acceptable. Bread- or biscuit-like malt aroma is acceptable. Fruity-ester and diacetyl aromas should be absent. Hop aroma is very low to medium-low. Sweet maltiness should dominate over clean hop bitterness. Malt character should be light toasted rather than strongly caramel, though a low level light caramel character is acceptable. Bread- or biscuit-like malt flavor is acceptable. Hop flavor is very low to medium-low. Hop bitterness is medium low to medium, and should not be aggressive or harsh. The American style of these classic German beers is distinguished by a comparatively greater degree of hop character. Fruity-ester and diacetyl aromas should not be perceived. Body is medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.05 — 1.06
    FG 1.012 — 1.02
    ABV 5.1 — 6.0
    IBU 20.0 — 30.0
    SRM 8.0 — 30.0
  • 8I - American-Style Dark Lager

    Comments

    American-Style Dark Lagers are light brown to very dark. Chill haze should not be perceived. Low malt aroma contains discrete contributions from caramel and roasted malts. Fruity-ester and diacetyl aromas should not be perceived. Hop aroma is very low to low. Low malt flavor contains discreet contributions from caramel and roasted malts. Non-malt adjuncts are often used. Hop flavor is very low to low. Hop bitterness is very low to low, and clean with a short duration of impact. Carbonation is high. Fruity-ester and diacetyl flavors should not be perceived. Body is light and clean.

    Stats

    OG 1.04 — 1.05
    FG 1.008 — 1.012
    ABV 4.1 — 5.6
    IBU 14.0 — 24.0
    SRM 28.0 — 50.0

Category 9 - Other Origin Lager Styles

  • 9A - Baltic-Style Porter

    Comments

    Baltic-Style Porters are very deep ruby/garnet to black. Distinctive malt aromas of caramelized sugars, licorice, and chocolate-like character of roasted malts and dark sugars are present. Roasted dark malts sometimes contribute coffee-like roast barley aroma. Low smoky aroma from malt may be evident. Debitterized roast malts are best used for this style. Because of its alcoholic strength, may include very low to low complex alcohol aromas and/or lager fruitiness such as berries, grapes, plums, but not banana; ale-like fruitiness from warm fermentation is not appropriate. Hop aroma is very low, though a hint of floral or sweet hop aroma can complement aromatics without dominance. Medium-low to medium-high malt sweetness is present, with distinctive flavors of caramelized sugars, licorice, and chocolate-like character of roasted malts and dark sugars. Roasted dark malts sometimes contribute coffee-like roast barley flavor, yet not bitter or astringent roast character. Low degree of smoky flavor from malt may be evident. Debitterized roast malts are best used for this style. Hop flavor is very low. Hop bitterness is low to medium-low. Baltic Porter is a true smooth cold-fermented and cold lagered beer, brewed with lager yeast. Because of its alcoholic strength, may include very low to low complex alcohol flavors and/or lager fruitiness such as berries, grapes, plums, but not banana; ale-like fruitiness from warm temperature fermentation is not appropriate. Diacetyl and DMS flavors should not be apparent. Body is medium to full.

    Stats

    OG 1.072 — 1.085
    FG 1.016 — 1.022
    ABV 7.6 — 9.1
    IBU 35.0 — 40.0
  • 9B - Australasian, Latin American or Tropical-Style Light Lager

    Comments

    Australasian, Latin American or Tropical-Style Light Lagers are straw to gold. Chill haze should be absent. Sugar, corn, rice, and other cereal grains are used as adjuncts. Sugar adjuncts are often used to lighten the body and flavor, sometimes contributing to a slight apple-like fruity ester aroma. Fruity-ester aromas should be very low to low. Diacetyl aroma should be absent. Hop aroma is not perceived to very low. Malt sweetness is absent. Sugar, corn, rice, and other cereal grains are used as an adjunct. Hop flavor is not perceived to very low. Hop bitterness is very low. Fruity-ester flavors should be very low to low. Sugar adjuncts are often used to lighten the body and flavor, sometimes contributing to a slight apple-like fruity ester flavor. Diacetyl flavor should be absent. Body is light.

    Stats

    OG 1.038 — 1.046
    FG 1.006 — 1.01
    ABV 4.1 — 5.1
    IBU 9.0 — 18.0
    SRM 4.0 — 10.0
  • 9C - International-Style Pilsener

    Comments

    International-Style Pilseners are straw to pale. Chill haze should not be perceived. These beers are often brewed with rice, corn, wheat, or other grain or sugar adjuncts making up part of the mash. Residual malt aroma is very low and does not predominate but may be perceived. Very low levels of DMS aroma are acceptable. Fruity-ester and diacetyl aromas should not be perceived. Hop aroma is low. Residual malt sweetness is very low and does not predominate but may be perceived. Hop flavor is low. Hop bitterness is low to medium. Very low levels of DMS flavor if perceived are acceptable. Fruity-ester and diacetyl flavors should not be perceived. Body is light to medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.044 — 1.05
    FG 1.008 — 1.01
    ABV 4.6 — 5.3
    IBU 17.0 — 30.0
    SRM 6.0 — 8.0

Category 10 - All Origin Hybrid/Mixed Lagers Or Ales

  • 10A - Session Beer

    Comments

    Session Beers are the color of the classic beer style being made to lower strength. Appearance will vary with style of beer being made to lower strength. Aroma depends on the style of beer being made to lower strength. Any style of beer can be made lower in strength than described in the classic style guidelines. The goal should be to reach a balance between the style's character and the lower alcohol content. Drinkability is a character in the overall balance of these beers. Beers in this category must not exceed 4.0% alcohol by weight (5.0% alcohol by volume). Beers above these limits that are entered into this category may be disqualified before judging or after results are announced. Body is variable with style. For purposes of competition, entries containing less than 4.0% abw (5.0% abv) which could be appropriately entered in any other classic or traditional category should be entered in that category and not entered as a session beer.

    Stats

    OG 1.034 — 1.04
    FG 1.004 — 1.01
    ABV 4.0 — 5.0
    IBU 10.0 — 30.0
  • 10B - American-Style Cream Ale

    Comments

    American-Style Cream Ales are straw to gold. Chill haze should not be perceived. Medium-low to medium pale malt aroma may be present. Caramelized malt aroma character should be absent. Fruity-ester aroma may be perceived. Sulfur character and/or DMS aroma should be extremely low or absent. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Hop aroma is usually absent. Medium-low to medium pale malt sweetness predominates. Caramelized malt character should be absent. Adjunct character (such as corn) may be perceived at low levels. Hop flavor is very low to low. Hop bitterness is very low to low. This mild ale is made using a warm fermentation (top or bottom fermenting yeast) and cold lagering. These beers are crisp and refreshing. Fermentation induced sulfur character and/or DMS flavor should be extremely low or absent from this style of beer. Diacetyl flavor should not be perceived. Body is light.

    Stats

    OG 1.044 — 1.052
    FG 1.004 — 1.01
    ABV 4.3 — 5.7
    IBU 10.0 — 22.0
    SRM 4.0 — 10.0
  • 10C - California Common Beer

    Comments

    California Common Beers are light amber to medium-amber. Chill haze should not be perceived. There is often a noticeable degree of caramel-type malt aroma. Fruity-ester aromas are low to medium-low. Diacetyl aroma should be absent. Hop aroma is low to medium-low. Noticeable caramel-type malt flavor is present. Hop flavor is low to medium-low. Hop bitterness is medium to medium high. California common beers are brewed with lager yeasts but at ale fermentation temperatures. Noticeable caramel-type malt flavor is present. Fruity-ester flavors are low to medium-low. The balance between fruity esters and malt character give an impression of balance and drinkability. Diacetyl flavor should be absent. Body is medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.045 — 1.056
    FG 1.01 — 1.018
    ABV 4.6 — 5.7
    IBU 35.0 — 45.0
    SRM 16.0 — 30.0
  • 10D - Light American Wheat Beer with Yeast

    Comments

    Light American Wheat Beer with Yeasts are pale to light amber. Because this style is served with yeast in the bottle, appearance may range from hazy to very cloudy. Chill haze is also acceptable. Low fruity-ester aroma is typical, as is low to medium-low malt aroma. Yeast aroma should be low to medium but not overpowering the balance and character of malt and hops. Phenolic, clove-like aromas should not be perceived. Diacetyl aroma should not be perceived. Hop aroma is low to medium. Low to medium-low malt sweetness is present. Hop flavor is low to medium. Hop bitterness is low to medium. These beers can be made using either ale or lager yeast. Grist includes at least 30 percent malted wheat. Low to medium yeast flavor should not overpower the balance and character of malt and hops. Low fruity-ester flavors are typical. Diacetyl and phenolic, clove-like flavors should not be perceived. Because this style is served with yeast the character should portray a full yeasty mouthfeel. Body is low to medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.036 — 1.056
    FG 1.006 — 1.018
    ABV 3.5 — 5.6
    IBU 10.0 — 35.0
    SRM 8.0 — 20.0
  • 10E - Light American Wheat Beer without Yeast

    Comments

    Light American Wheat Beer without Yeasts are straw to light amber. Chill haze is acceptable in these versions packaged and served without yeast. Low fruity-ester aroma is typical, as is low to medium-low malt aroma. Phenolic, clove-like aromas should not be perceived. Diacetyl aroma should not be perceived. No yeast aroma should be evident. Hop aroma is low to medium. Low to medium-low malt sweetness is present. Hop flavor is low to medium. Hop bitterness is low to medium. These beers can be made using either ale or lager yeast. Grist includes at least 30 percent malted wheat. No yeast flavor should be evident. Low fruity-ester flavors are typical. Diacetyl and phenolic, clove-like flavors should not be perceived. Body is low to medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.036 — 1.05
    FG 1.004 — 1.016
    ABV 3.8 — 5.1
    IBU 10.0 — 35.0
    SRM 4.0 — 20.0
  • 10F - Dark American Wheat Beer with Yeast

    Comments

    Dark American Wheat Beer with Yeasts are medium amber to dark brown. Because this style is served with yeast in the bottle, appearance may range from hazy to very cloudy. Chill haze is also acceptable. Malt aromas can include low roasted malt characters evident as cocoa/chocolate or caramel, and/or aromatic toffee-like, caramel, or biscuit- like characters. Low fruity-ester aroma is typical, as is low to medium-low malt aroma. Yeast aroma should be low to medium but not overpowering the balance and character of malt and hops. Phenolic, clove-like aromas should not be perceived. Diacetyl aroma should not be perceived. Hop aroma is low to medium. Medium-low to medium-high malt sweetness is present. Malt flavors can include low roasted malt characters evident as cocoa/chocolate or caramel, and/or aromatic toffee-like, caramel, or biscuit-like characters. Roast malt astringency is acceptable when balanced with malt sweetness. Hop flavor is low to medium. Hop bitterness is low to medium. These beers can be made using either ale or lager yeast. Grist includes at least 30 percent malted wheat. Low to medium yeast flavor should not overpower the balance and character of malt and hops. Low fruity-ester flavors are typical. Diacetyl and phenolic, clove-like flavors should not be perceived. Because this style is served with yeast the character should portray a full yeasty mouthfeel. Body is low to medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.036 — 1.05
    FG 1.004 — 1.016
    ABV 3.8 — 5.1
    IBU 10.0 — 25.0
    SRM 18.0 — 44.0
  • 10G - Dark American Wheat Beer without Yeast

    Comments

    Dark American Wheat Beer without Yeasts are medium amber to dark brown. Chill haze is acceptable in these versions packaged and served without yeast. Malt aromas can include low roasted malt characters evident as cocoa/chocolate or caramel, and/or aromatic toffee-like, caramel, or biscuit-like characters. Low fruity-ester aroma is typical, as is low to medium-low malt aroma. Phenolic, clove-like aromas should not be perceived. Diacetyl aroma should not be perceived. No yeast aroma should be evident. Hop aroma is low to medium. Medium-low to medium-high malt sweetness is present. Malt flavors can include low roasted malt characters evident as cocoa/chocolate or caramel, and/or aromatic toffee-like, caramel, or biscuit-like characters. Roast malt astringency acceptable when balanced with malt sweetness. Hop flavor is low to medium. Hop bitterness is low to medium. These beers can be made using either ale or lager yeast. Grist includes at least 30 percent malted wheat. No yeast flavor should be evident. Low fruity-ester flavors are typical. Diacetyl and phenolic, clove-like flavors should not be perceived. Because this style is packaged and served without yeast, no yeast characters should be evident in mouthfeel. Body is low to medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.036 — 1.05
    FG 1.004 — 1.016
    ABV 3.8 — 5.1
    IBU 10.0 — 25.0
    SRM 18.0 — 44.0
  • 10H - American-Style Fruit Beer

    Comments

    American-Style Fruit Beers are any range of color from pale to dark depending on underlying style. Clear or hazy beer is acceptable in appearance. Fruit aromas ranging from subtle to intense should be evident, and should not be overpowered by hop aromas. American-Style Fruit Beers are fermented with traditional German, British or American ale or lager yeast using fruit or fruit extracts as an adjunct in either the mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation providing obvious (ranging from subtle to intense), yet harmonious, fruit qualities. Fruit beers fermented using Belgian-, farmhouse-, saison- and/or Brettanomyces-type yeast would be more appropriately categorized as Belgian-Style Fruit Beers. Hop aroma is not perceived to medium-low. Malt sweetness can vary from none to medium-high levels. Hop flavor is not perceived to medium-low. Hop bitterness is in balance and usually at very low to medium levels. Fruit qualities should not be overpowered by hop character. Acidic bacterial (not wild yeast) fermentation characters may be evident (but not necessary) and if present contribute to acidity and enhance fruity balance. Classifying these beers is complex with exemplary versions depending on the exhibition of fruit characters moreso than the addition of fruit itself. As an example, a juniper berry-flavored beer with notable juniper berry fruity flavor and/or aroma characters evident would be appropriately considered as Fruit Beer; whereas such a beer in which juniper berry characters are expressed more as herbal or spice quality would appropriately be considered as an Herb and Spice Beer. Body is variable with style. A statement by the brewer explaining what fruits are used is essential in order for fair assessment in competitions. If this beer is a classic style with fruit, the brewer should also specify the classic style. Fruit Beers also brewed with unusual fermentable should be entered in the fruit beer category.

    Stats

    OG 1.03 — 1.11
    FG 1.006 — 1.03
    ABV 2.5 — 12.0
    IBU 5.0 — 70.0
    SRM 10.0 — 100.0
  • 10I - Fruit Wheat Beer with or without Yeast

    Comments

    Fruit Wheat Beer with or without Yeasts are straw to light amber, with hue depending on type of fruit used. Color should reflect a degree of fruit's color. Chill haze is acceptable. When served with yeast, appearance is hazy to very cloudy. Fruit or fruit extracts contribute aroma with fruit qualities perceived as authentic and replicating true fruit complexity as much as possible. Low fruity-ester aroma is typical, as is low to medium-low malt aroma. Fruited German-style wheat beers that fit the other descriptors for this style are permissible. Diacetyl aroma should not be perceived. Yeast and yeast generated aroma should be low to medium but not overpowering in versions served with yeast. Hop aroma is low to medium. Low to medium-low malt sweetness is present. Hop flavor is low to medium. Hop bitterness is low to medium. These beers can be made using either ale or lager yeast. Grist includes at least 30 percent malted wheat. Fruit or fruit extracts contribute flavor with fruit qualities perceived as authentic and replicating true fruit complexity as much as possible. Low fruity-ester flavor from yeast is typical. Diacetyl flavor should not be perceived. Yeast and yeast generated flavor should be low to medium but not overpowering in versions served with yeast. In versions served with yeast the character should portray a full yeasty mouthfeel. Body is low to medium. Brewer may indicate on the bottle whether the yeast should be intentionally roused or if they prefer that the entry be poured as quietly as possible.

    Stats

    OG 1.036 — 1.05
    FG 1.004 — 1.016
    ABV 3.8 — 5.1
    IBU 10.0 — 35.0
  • 10J - Belgian-Style Fruit Beer

    Comments

    Belgian-Style Fruit Beers are any range of color. Clear to hazy beer is acceptable in appearance. Fruit aromas ranging from subtle to intense should be evident, and should not be overpowered by hop aromas. Malt sweetness can vary from not perceived to medium-high levels. Acidic bacterial (not wild yeast) fermentation characters may be evident (but not necessary) and if present contribute to acidity and enhance fruity balance. Classifying these beers is complex, with exemplary versions depending on the exhibition of fruit characters moreso than the addition of fruit itself. As an example, a juniper berry-flavored beer with notable juniper berry fruity flavor and/or aroma characters evident would be appropriately considered as Fruit Beer; whereas such a beer in which juniper berry characters are expressed more as herbal or spice quality would appropriately be considered as an Herb and Spice Beer. Lambic style fruit beers should be entered in the Belgian-Style Fruit Lambic category. For purposes of this competition coconut is defined as a vegetable; beers exhibiting coconut character would be appropriately entered as field beer. Body is variable with style. A statement by the brewer explaining what fruits are used is essential in order for fair assessment in competitions. If this beer is a classic style with fruit, the brewer should also specify the classic style. Fruit Beers also brewed with unusual fermentable should be entered in the fruit beer category.

    Stats

    OG 1.03 — 1.11
    FG 1.006 — 1.03
    ABV 2.5 — 12.0
    IBU 5.0 — 70.0
    SRM 10.0 — 100.0
  • 10K - Field Beer

    Comments

    Field Beers are any range of color from pale to very dark depending on the underlying style. Clear or hazy beer is acceptable in appearance. Vegetable aromas ranging from subtle to intense should be evident, and should not be overpowered by hop aromas. Field Beers are any beers using vegetables as an adjunct in either the mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation, providing obvious (ranging from subtle to intense), yet harmonious, qualities. Malt sweetness can vary from very low to medium-high levels. Hop bitterness is very low to medium-high. Vegetable qualities should not be overpowered by hop character. Classifying these beers is complex, with exemplary versions depending on the exhibition of vegetable characters moreso than the addition of vegetable itself. As an example, a chili-flavored beer with notable roast or vegetal chili flavor and/or aroma characters evident would be appropriately considered as Field Beer; whereas such a beer in which chili characters are expressed more as herbal or spice quality (such as the “heat” of a chili pepper) would appropriately be considered as Herb/Spice Beers. For purposes of this competition, coconut is defined as a vegetable, and beers containing coconut would be appropriately entered as field beer. Body is variable with style. A statement by the brewer explaining what vegetables are used is essential in order for fair assessment in competitions. If this beer is a classic style with vegetables, the brewer should also specify the classic style. Note: If no Pumpkin beer category exists in a competition, then Pumpkin beers should be entered in this category.

    Stats

    OG 1.03 — 1.11
    FG 1.006 — 1.03
    ABV 2.5 — 13.3
    IBU 5.0 — 70.0
    SRM 10.0 — 100.0
  • 10L - Pumpkin Beer

    Comments

    Pumpkin Beers are any range of color from pale to very dark depending on the underlying style. Clear or hazy beer is acceptable in appearance. Pumpkin or winter squash aromas ranging from subtle to intense should be evident. These beers are any beers using pumpkins (Cucurbito pepo) or winter squash as an adjunct in either the mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation, providing obvious (ranging from subtle to intense), yet harmonious, qualities. They may or may not be spiced with other ingredients. Hop and spice aromas should not overpower pumpkin, squash or overall balance of aromas. Spice emphasized beers should be entered in the spice and herb category. Hop aroma is low to medium. Malt sweetness often varies from low to medium high levels. Hop flavor is low to medium, and not overpowering pumpkin or squash characters. Hop bitterness is low to medium-low. Exemplary versions exhibit pumpkin or squash characters, which should not be overpowered by balanced, harmonious hop or spice characters (if present). Body is variable with style. A statement by the brewer explaining the nature of the beer is essential for fair assessment in competitions. If this beer is a classic style with pumpkin, the brewer should also specify the classic style.

    Stats

    OG 1.03 — 1.11
    FG 1.006 — 1.03
    ABV 2.5 — 12.0
    IBU 5.0 — 70.0
    SRM 10.0 — 100.0
  • 10M - Chocolate/Cocoa-Flavored Beer

    Comments

    Chocolate/Cocoa-Flavored Beers are light brown to black depending on the underlying style. Clear or hazy beer is acceptable in appearance. Chocolate Beers are any beers using “dark” chocolate or cocoa in any of its forms other than or in addition to hops to create a distinct (ranging from subtle to intense) character. Hop aroma is not perceived to very low. Medium-low to medium-high malt sweetness helps accent cocoa flavors and aromas. Hop flavor is lower than might be expected for style of beer. Under hopping allows chocolate to contribute to the flavor profile while not becoming excessively bitter. Hop bitterness is very low to medium-low. Other flavors may be infused but chocolate should be dominant character. Beers made with white chocolate do not exemplify this category. Body is variable with style. If this beer is a classic style made with chocolate or cocoa, the brewer should specify the classic style.

    Stats

    OG 1.03 — 1.11
    FG 1.006 — 1.03
    ABV 2.5 — 12.0
    IBU 15.0 — 40.0
    SRM 30.0 — 100.0
  • 10N - Coffee-Flavored Beer

    Comments

    Coffee-Flavored Beers are pale to black depending on the underlying style. Clear or hazy beer is acceptable in appearance. Coffee beers use coffee in any of its forms to create a distinct (ranging from subtle to intense) character. Hop aroma is low to high depending on the intent of the underlying style. Medium-low to medium malt sweetness helps accent coffee flavor and aromas. Hop flavor is reflective of aroma and can be low to high depending on the intent of the underlying style. Hop bitterness is very low to medium-high. Body is variable with style. If this beer is a classic style with coffee flavor, the brewer may specify the classic style.

    Stats

    OG 1.03 — 1.11
    FG 1.006 — 1.03
    ABV 2.5 — 12.0
    IBU 15.0 — 70.0
    SRM 8.0 — 100.0
  • 10O - Herb and Spice Beer

    Comments

    Herb and Spice Beers are any range of color depending on underlying style. Clear or hazy beer is acceptable in appearance. Herb and Spice beers are any beers using herbs or spices (derived from roots, seeds, fruits, vegetable, flowers, etc.) other than or in addition to hops to create a distinct (ranging from subtle to intense). Individual aroma and/or flavor characters of herbs and/or spices used may not always be identifiable but should be evident. Hop aroma is not essential but may be evident at low levels and should not dominate over herb-spice character. Malt sweetness will vary dramatically depending on overall balance desired. Hop flavor is not essential but may be evident at low levels and should not dominate over herb-spice character. Hop bitterness is very low to low. The perception of low hop bitterness is optimal for highlighting herbal/spice characters. Positive evaluations are significantly based on perceived balance of flavors. Classifying these beers can be complex; entries which exhibit primarily herbal and/or spicy qualities would appropriately considered as Herb/Spice Beer. As described in other categories and by way of example, chili-flavored beer with notable roast or vegetal chili flavor and/or aroma characters evident would be appropriately considered as Field Beer; whereas such a beer in which chili characters are expressed more as herbal or spice quality (such as the “heat” of a chili pepper) would appropriately be considered as Herb/Spice Beers. Pumpkin beers in which herb and spice characters dominate would also be appropriately be considered as Herb/Spice beers. Body is variable with style. A statement by the brewer explaining what herbs or spices are used is essential in order to qualify in this category and is helpful for fair assessment in competitions. Specifying a style upon which the beer is based may help evaluation. If this beer is a classic style with an herb or spice, the brewer should specify the classic style.

    Stats

    OG 1.03 — 1.11
    FG 1.006 — 1.03
    ABV 2.5 — 12.0
    IBU 5.0 — 40.0
    SRM 10.0 — 100.0
  • 10P - Specialty Beer

    Comments

    Specialty Beers are very light to black depending on the underlying style. Clear or hazy beer is acceptable in appearance. Specialty Beers are brewed with unusual fermentable sugars, grains and/or starches other than or in addition to malted barley, which contribute to alcohol content. For example, maple syrup or potatoes are considered unusual. Rice, corn, or wheat are not considered unusual. The distinctive characters of these special ingredients should be evident in the aroma, flavor and/or overall balance of the beer, but not necessarily in overpowering quantities. Malt sweetness will vary dramatically depending on overall balance desired. Hop bitterness is very low to very high, and may be used for highlighting desired characters. Nuts generally have some degree of fermentables, thus a beer brewed with nuts would be appropriately considered as a Specialty Beer. A beer brewed with honey would most appropriately be considered as a Honey Beer. Beer brewed with roots, seeds, flowers etc. and which exhibit herbal and/or spicy characters would be appropriately considered as Herb and Spice Beer. Examples might include a chili-flavored beer that emphasize heat rather than chili flavor, or a juniper berry beer in which juniper berry characters are expressed more as herbal or spice quality than as berry fruity character. While beers brewed with fruits or vegetables may derive fermentable carbohydrate from those sources, such beers which exhibit fruit or vegetable qualities would most appropriately be considered as fruit or field beers. Body is variable with style. Special ingredients must be listed when competing. A statement by the brewer explaining the special nature of the beer, ingredient(s) and achieved character is essential in order for fair assessment in competitions. If this beer is a classic style with some specialty ingredient(s), the brewer should also specify the classic style. Guidelines for competing: Spiced beers using unusual fermentables should be entered in the experimental category. Beers brewed with unusual fermentables as well as fruit should be entered in the fruit beer category.

    Stats

    IBU 1.0 — 100.0
    SRM 2.0 — 200.0
  • 10Q - Specialty Honey Beer

    Comments

    Specialty Honey Beers are very light to black depending on underlying style. Clear or hazy beer is acceptable in appearance. Honey Beers use honey in addition to malted barley. Character of honey should be evident in aroma, flavor and/or overall balance with the other components, without overpowering them. Malt sweetness will vary dramatically depending on overall balance desired. Hop bitterness is very low to very high, and may be used for highlighting desired characters. Honey Beers may be brewed to a traditional style, or may be experimental. Body is variable with style. A statement by the brewer explaining the classic or other style of the beer, and the type of honey used is essential in order for fair assessment in competitions.

    Stats

    OG 1.03 — 1.11
    FG 1.006 — 1.03
    ABV 2.5 — 12.0
    IBU 1.0 — 100.0
    SRM 2.0 — 200.0
  • 10R - Rye Beer with or without Yeast

    Comments

    Rye Beer with or without Yeasts are often versions of classic styles that contain noticeable rye character in balance with other qualities of the beer. As such they include a wide range of color. Lighter versions are straw to copper, while darker versions are dark amber to dark brown. Chill haze is acceptable in these versions packaged and served without yeast. In versions served with yeast, appearance may range from hazy to very cloudy. Low spicy, fruity-estery aromas are typical. Phenolic, clove-like aromas should not be perceived. In darker versions malt aromas can optionally include low roasted malt characters evident as cocoa/chocolate or caramel, and/or aromatic toffee-like, caramel, or biscuit-like characters. Diacetyl aroma should not be perceived. No yeast aroma should be evident in versions without yeast. Low to medium yeast aroma should not overpower the balance and character of rye and barley malt and hops in versions with yeast. Hop aroma is low to medium-high. In darker versions malt flavor can optionally include low roasted malt characters evident as cocoa/chocolate or caramel, and/or aromatic toffee-like, caramel, or biscuit-like characters. Low level roast malt astringency acceptable when balanced with low to medium malt sweetness. Hop flavor is low to medium-high. Hop bitterness is low to medium. These beers can be made using either ale or lager yeast. Grist should include sufficient rye such that rye character is evident in the beer. Classic styles of beer brewed with rye but which do not exhibit rye character are more appropriately considered as examples of the classic style. Low level spicy, fruity-ester flavor is typical; phenolic clove-like characteristics and diacetyl should not be perceived. A low level of tannin derived astringency may be perceived. In versions packaged and served without yeast, no yeast characters should be evident in mouthfeel. Versions served with yeast should portray a full yeasty mouthfeel. Body is low to medium. Competition directors may create specific styles of rye beer, such as Rye Pale Ale or Rye Brown Ale. A Statement by the brewer indicating if the beer is based on a classic style is essential for accurate judging.

  • 10S - German-Style Rye Ale (Roggenbier) with or without Yeast

    Comments

    German-Style Rye Ale (Roggenbier) with or without Yeasts are pale to very dark, with darker versions running dark amber to dark brown. Chill haze is acceptable in these versions packaged and served without yeast. In versions served with yeast, appearance may range from hazy to very cloudy. Low banana–like fruity-ester aroma is typical; phenolic, clove-like aromas should also be perceived. In darker versions malt aromas can optionally include low roasted malt characters evident as cocoa/chocolate or caramel, and/or aromatic toffee-like, caramel, or biscuit-like characters. Diacetyl aroma should not be perceived. No yeast aroma should be evident in versions without yeast. Low to medium yeast aroma should not overpower the balance and character of rye and barley malt and hops in versions with yeast. Hop aroma is not perceived. Malt sweetness will vary from low to medium. In darker versions malt flavor can optionally include low roasted malt characters evident as cocoa/chocolate or caramel, and/or aromatic toffee-like, caramel, or biscuit-like characters. Low level roast malt astringency acceptable when balanced with low to medium level malt sweetness. No yeast flavor should be evident in versions without yeast. Low to medium yeast aroma should not overpower the balance and character of rye and barley malt and hops in versions with yeast. Hop flavor is not perceived. Hop bitterness is very low to low. These beers can be made using phenol producing yeast. Grist should include at least 30 percent rye malt. Low banana-like fruity-ester flavor is typical; phenolic, clove-like characteristics should also be perceived. Diacetyl flavor should not be perceived. In versions packaged and served without yeast, no yeast characters should be evident in mouthfeel. Versions served with yeast should portray a full yeasty mouthfeel. Body is low to medium.

    Stats

    OG 1.047 — 1.056
    FG 1.008 — 1.016
    ABV 4.9 — 5.6
    IBU 10.0 — 15.0
    SRM 8.0 — 50.0
  • 10T - Japanese Sake-Yeast Beer

    Comments

    Japanese Sake-Yeast Beers are pale to dark brown. Slight chill haze is permissible. These beers are brewed with sake yeast or sake (koji) enzymes. The unique aromas of the byproducts of sake yeast and/or koji enzymes should be distinctive and harmonize with the other malt and hop aromas. Sake character may best be described as having mild fruitiness and a gentle and mild yeast extract-Vitamin B character. Malt aroma is very low to medium. Hop aroma is low to medium and should harmonize with sake-like characters. Malt sweetness is very low to medium. Hop flavor is low to medium and should harmonize with sake-like characters. Hop bitterness is low to medium and should harmonize with sake-like characters. A high amount of alcohol may be evident. The unique flavors of the byproducts of sake yeast and/or koji enzymes should be distinctive and harmonize with other malt and hop characters. Sake character may be best described as having mild fruitiness and a gentle and mild yeast extract- Vitamin B character. High carbonation should be evident. Body is dependent on base style and original gravity, as is mouthfeel.

    Stats

    OG 1.04 — 1.06
    FG 1.008 — 1.018
    ABV 4.3 — 7.1
    IBU 12.0 — 35.0
    SRM 8.0 — 40.0
  • 10U - Fresh or Wet Hop Beer

    Comments

    Fresh or Wet Hop Beers are the color of the underlying ale style being made with fresh hops. Fruity-ester aroma is high, although somewhat dependent on the ale style being made with fresh hops. Hop aroma is prominent and will exhibit especially aromas of green, almost chlorophyll-like or other fresh hop characters. Malt perception will vary with the style of ale being made with fresh hops. Hop flavor is prominent, exhibiting especially flavors of green, almost chlorophyll-like or other fresh hop characters. Hop bitterness is dependent on the style of ale being made with fresh hops. These ales are hopped predominantly with fresh (newly harvested and kilned) and/or undried (“wet”) hops. Beers may be aged and enjoyed after initial "fresh-hop" character diminishes. Unique character from "aged" fresh hop beers may emerge, but have yet to be defined. Body is dependent on the style of ale being made with fresh hops. The manner in which fresh “wet” hops are used should be identified by the brewer. To allow for accurate judging the brewer must identify a classic, hybrid/mixed or experimental beer style being elaborated upon. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

  • 10V - Wood- and Barrel-Aged Beer

    Comments

    Wood- and Barrel-Aged Beers are any range of color. Any lager, ale or hybrid beer, either a traditional style or a unique experimental beer, can be aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood. These beers are aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel; but, wood aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood-flavors. New wood character can be characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and/or other unique wood character. Used sherry, rum, bourbon, scotch, port, wine and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to beer. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors. Wood-Aged Beers may or may not have Brettanomyces character. Body is variable with style. When entering this category brewers should specify type of barrel and/or wood used and any other special treatment or ingredients used. Competition managers may create style subcategories to differentiate between high alcohol and low alcohol beers and very dark and lighter colored beer as well as for fruit beers and non-fruit beers. Competitions may develop guidelines requesting brewers to specify what kind of wood (new or used oak, other wood varieties) and/or barrel (whiskey, port, sherry, wine, etc.) was used in the process. The brewer should explain the special nature (wood used, base beer style(s) and achieved character) of the beer.

  • 10W - Wood- and Barrel-Aged Pale to Amber Beer

    Comments

    Wood- and Barrel-Aged Pale to Amber Beers are pale to copper. For purposes of competition these wood-aged beers have color less than 18 SRM or 36 EBC, and contain alcohol less than 5.2% abw or 6.5% abv. Darker wood- aged beers (>18 SRM or >36 EBC) or higher alcohol wood-aged beers (>5% abw or >6.25% abv) of any color would be more appropriately considered as other beer styles. Any lager, ale or hybrid beer in the appropriate color range, either a traditional style or a unique experimental beer, can be aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood. Primary character of the original beer style may or may not be apparent. These beers are aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel; but, wood aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood-flavors. New wood character can be characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and/or other unique wood character. Used sherry, rum, bourbon, scotch, port, wine and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to beer. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors. Wood-Aged Pale to Amber Beers may or may not have Brettanomyces character. Fruited or spiced beer that are wood and barrel aged would also be appropriately entered in this category. Sour wood-aged beer of any color are outlined in other categories. Body is variable with style. The brewer should explain the special nature of the beer to allow for accurate judging. Comments could include: type of wood used (new or old, oak or other wood type), type of barrel used (new, port/ whiskey/ wine/ sherry/ other), base beer style or achieved character. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

    Stats

    ABV 3.75 — 6.5
    SRM 8.0 — 36.0
  • 10X - Wood- and Barrel-Aged Dark Beer

    Comments

    Wood- and Barrel-Aged Dark Beers are brown to black. For purposes of competition these wood-aged beers have color greater than 18 SRM or 36 EBC, and contain alcohol less than 5.2% abw or 6.5% abv. Paler wood-aged beers (<18 SRM or <36 EBC) or higher alcohol wood-aged beers (>5% abw or >6.25% abv) of any color would be more appropriately considered as other beer styles. Any lager, ale or hybrid beer in the appropriate color range, either a traditional style or a unique experimental beer, can be aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood. Primary character of the original beer style may or may not be apparent. These beers are aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel; but, wood aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood-flavors. New wood character can be characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and/or other unique wood character. Used sherry, rum, bourbon, scotch, port, wine and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to beer. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors. Wood-Aged Dark Beers may or may not have Brettanomyces character. Dark fruited or spiced beer that is wood and barrel aged would also be appropriately entered in this category. Sour wood-aged beer of any color is outlined in other categories. Body is variable with style. The brewer should explain the special nature of the beer to allow for accurate judging. Comments could include: type of wood used (new or old, oak or other wood type), type of barrel used (new, port/ whiskey/ wine/ sherry/ other), base beer style or achieved character. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

    Stats

    ABV 3.75 — 6.5
  • 10Y - Wood- and Barrel-Aged Strong Beer

    Comments

    Wood- and Barrel-Aged Strong Beers are any color. For purposes of competition these wood-aged beers contain alcohol greater than 5.2% abw or 6.5% abv. Examples of wood- and barrel-aged strong beer styles include but are not limited to wood-aged barley wine, double porter, triple pale ale or any other wood-aged strong beer style that meets the criteria for alcohol content, with the exceptions of wood-aged strong stout styles which are outlined elsewhere. Any strong classic or unique experimental lager, ale or hybrid beer style, either a traditional style or unique experimental beers, can be aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood. Primary character of the original beer style may or may not be apparent. These beers are aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel; but, wood aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood-flavors. New wood character can be characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and/or other unique wood character. Used sherry, rum, bourbon, scotch, port, wine and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to beer. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors. Wood-Aged Beers may or may not have Brettanomyces character. Sour wood-aged strong beers of any color are outlined in other categories. Body is variable with style. The brewer should explain the special nature of the beer to allow for accurate judging. Comments could include: type of wood used (new or old, oak or other wood type), type of barrel used (new, port/ whiskey/ wine/ sherry/ other), base beer style, and/or any other special treatment or ingredients used. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

  • 10Z - Wood- and Barrel-Aged Sour Beer

    Comments

    Wood- and Barrel-Aged Sour Beers are very light to black. Any lager, ale or hybrid beers, either in a traditional style or unique experimental beers, can be aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood, and, develop bacterial induced natural acidity. These beers are aged with the intention of introducing the micro flora present in the wood. Sometimes wood aging is intended to impart the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel; but, wood aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood- flavors. New wood character can be characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and/or other unique wood character. Used sherry, rum, bourbon, scotch, port, wine and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to beer. These wood-derived flavors, if present in this style, can be very low in character and barely perceived or evident or assertive as wood-derived flavors. Any degree of wood-derived flavors should be in balance with other beer character. Usually bacteria and “wild” yeasts fermentation contributes complex esters and results in dry to very dry beers. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of acidity, complex esters, and new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors. Wood-Aged Beers may or may not have Brettanomyces character. Body is variable with style. Fruit and herb/spiced versions may take on the hue, flavors and aromas of added ingredients. Brewers when entering this category should specify type of barrel used and any other special treatment or ingredients used. Competition managers may create style subcategories to differentiate between high alcohol and low alcohol beers and very dark and lighter colored beer as well as for fruit beers and non-fruit beers. Competitions may develop guidelines requesting brewers to specify what kind of wood (new or used oak, other wood varieties). The brewer may be asked to explain the special nature (wood used, base beer style(s), special treatment or ingredients and achieved character) of the beer.

  • 10AA - Aged Beer

    Comments

    Aged Beers are any range or color from very light to black. Aged Beers are any beer aged for over one year. A brewer may brew any type of beer of any strength and enhance its character with extended and creative aging conditions. Generally, but not exclusively, beers with high hopping rates, roast malt content, high alcohol content, and/or complex herbal, smoke or fruit content lend themselves to aging. Beers which are wood aged, or exhibit Brettanomyces characters or sour/acidic beers should be classified or entered into other categories if those options are available. Beers in this category may be aged in bottles or any type of food grade vessel. Aged character may manifest itself in mouthfeel, aroma and flavor. Often aged character is an expression of oxidative reactions that either bring individual extreme characters into harmony or are characters unique unto themselves. Sherry, fruity and hop transitions are common during aging. No matter what the effect, the overall balance should be balanced, harmonic and not extreme or distastefully aggressive. The level of changes created by aging will vary with different types of beer types. Lighter flavored beer types may often manifest aggressive and distasteful oxidation. Whereas higher elevations of hops, malt or alcohol can help create synergies with “good” oxidative change. Body is variable with style. In competition brewers may be required to state age of beer. Competition organizer may develop guidelines in which aged beers are subcategorized by aging time, vessel, styles, etc. Brewers should provide a statement describing the nature or style of the beer. This statement could include classic or other style, special ingredients, length of aging time, etc.

  • 10AB - Experimental Beer

    Comments

    Experimental Beers are any range of color. Experimental beer is any beer that is primarily grain-based and employs unique and unusual techniques and/or ingredients or a combination of ingredients and techniques. A minimum 51% of the fermentable carbohydrates must be derived from malted grains. The overall uniqueness of the process, ingredients used and creativity should be considered in positive evaluations. Beers such as field, fruit, chocolate, coffee, spice, specialty or other beers that match existing categories should not be entered into this category. Beers not easily matched to existing style categories in a competition would often be entered into this category. Beers that are a combination of two or more other categories, and which exhibit distinctive characters of each of those categories, may also be entered into this category. Uniqueness is the primary consideration when evaluating this category. Body is variable with style. A statement by the brewer explaining the unique and experimental or other nature of the beer is essential in order for fair assessment in competitions. Generally, a 25- word statement would suffice in explaining the experimental nature of the beer.

  • 10AC - Indigenous/Regional Beer

    Comments

    Indigenous/Regional Beers are any range of color. Clear, hazy or cloudy appearance is acceptable depending on style. Malt sweetness will vary dramatically depending on overall balance desired. Hop bitterness is very low to very high, and may be used for highlighting desired characters. This beer style commemorates combinations of ingredients and techniques adopted by or unique to a brewery’s particular region and differentiated from ingredients and techniques commonly used by brewers throughout the world. For the purpose of defining this style, uniqueness of ingredients, regional heritage, technical brewing skill, balance of character, background story defines the intent of this category. The use of hops, yeast, water, malt, or any raw grain regardless of origin does not by itself qualify beers as an Indigenous/Regional beer. "Indigenous/Regional Beers" that are not represented elsewhere in these guidelines by a defined style could possibly be entered in such categories as Experimental, Herb & Spice, Field Beer, etc. but by choice a brewer may categorize (and enter) their beer as indigenous beer in this category. Beers that represent established historical traditions should be entered in “Historical Beers” or other categories and should not be entered in Indigenous/Regional Beer category. Body is variable with style. Proper evaluation of these beers requires brewers to provide judges with additional information, which illustrates the intent, background, history, design and/or development of the beer as well as describing any regional and/or stylistic context, choice of ingredients, process and any other unique information, helps establish a basis for comparison between highly diverse entries. Brewers must provide a short statement (100 words or less) illustrating the above and why it is an indigenous beer without revealing the company’s identity. This statement should be carefully crafted and will be evaluated by judges and carry significant weight in their decisions. Statements that contain information which might identify or otherwise create bias towards the entry will be modified by the Competition Manager. Entries not accompanied by this information will be at a profound disadvantage during judging.

  • 10AD - Historical Beer

    Comments

    Historical Beers are any range of color. Malt sweetness will vary dramatically depending on overall balance desired. Hop bitterness is very low to very high. Above all beers in this category are reflective of an established historical beer and/or brewing heritage from any period of time or part of the world, that are not already a beer style already established in these guidelines. This beer style commemorates combinations of unique brewing ingredients and/or techniques established in past periods. Examples of Historical Beers might include current day versions of historic styles which are not represented elsewhere in these guidelines, such as Finnish-style Sahti, South American Chicha, Nepalese Chong/Chang, African sorghum based beers, and others. In evaluating these beers, judges will weigh several factors such as uniqueness, heritage, regional distinction, technical brewing skills, and balance of character, background story & information and overall spirit of the intent of this category. Body is variable with style. "Historical beers" that are not represented elsewhere as a definitive style in these guidelines could possibly be entered in such categories as Experimental, Herb & Spice, Field Beer, etc. but by choice a brewer may categorize (and enter) their beer as Historical beer. Brewers must provide a short statement (100 words or less) illustrating the historical context without revealing the company’s identity. This information helps establish a basis for comparison between highly diverse entries. This statement should be carefully crafted and will be evaluated by judges and carry significant weight in their decisions. Statements that contain information which might identify or otherwise create bias towards the entry will be modified by the Competition Manager. Entries not accompanied by this information will be at a profound disadvantage during judging.

  • 10AE - Wild Beer

    Comments

    Wild Beers are any range of color. These beers may be clear or hazy due to yeast, chill haze or hop haze. Aromas may vary tremendously due to fermentation characters contributed by various known and unknown microorganisms. The overall balance should be complex and balanced. Hop aroma is very low to high. Usually because of a high degree of attenuation in these beers, malt character is very low to low. If there are exceptions that are malty, the overall balance of complexity of other characters should be in harmony. Hop flavor is very low to high. Hop bitterness is perceived at varying levels depending on the overall balance, but usually perceived as very low to low. Wild beers are spontaneously or otherwise fermented with microorganisms that the brewer has introduced from the ambient air/environment in the vicinity of the brewery in which the beer is brewed. Wild beers may not be fermented with any cultured strains of yeast or bacteria. Wild beer may or may not be perceived as acidic. It may include a wildly variable spectrum of flavors and aromas derived from the wild microorganisms with which it was fermented. The overall balance of flavors, aromas, appearance and body is an important factor in assessing these beers. Body is very low to medium. For competition purposes, specific styles of "Wild Beer" that fit already existing styles such as Belgian-style Lambics or Gueuze can be entered in those categories at the option of the entering brewery. Competition directors may create specific subcategories of Wild Beer, such as Pale or Dark, fruit, spice, etc.

  • 10AF - Smoke Beer

    Comments

    Smoke Beers are any beer of any style incorporating smoke, and therefore may range from very light to black. Any style of beer can be smoked; the goal is to reach a balance between the style's character and the smoky properties. Any smoke beer that does not fit other smoke beer categories would be appropriately considered here. Body is variable with style. Type of wood or other sources of smoke should be specified as well as the style the beer is based upon.

  • 10AG - Other Strong Ale or Lager

    Comments

    Other Strong Ale or Lagers are any color from very light to black. Any style of beer can be made stronger than the classic style guidelines. The goal should be to reach a balance between the style's character and the additional alcohol. Whenever possible, refer to accompanying guidelines when making styles stronger and appropriately identify the style created (for example: double alt, triple fest, or quadruple Pilsener). Body is variable with style. In competition brewers may be required to state the underlying style of beer being made stronger. This statement could include a reference to a classic or other style, and/or a reference to level of strength of the resulting beer.

  • 10AH - Gluten-Free Beer

    Comments

    Gluten-Free Beers are very light to black. These are beers (lager, ale or other) made from fermentable sugars, grains and converted carbohydrates. Ingredients do not contain gluten, in other words zero gluten (No barley, wheat, spelt, rye, etc.) Gluten-Free Beers may, or may not, contain malted grains that do not contain gluten. Sweetness will vary dramatically depending on overall balance desired. Hop bitterness is very low to very high, and may be used for highlighting desired characters. Brewers may, or may not, design and identify these beers along other style guidelines with regard to aroma, flavor and appearance profile. The beer’s overall balance and character should be based on its own merits and not necessarily compared with traditional styles of beer. In competitions, brewers identify ingredients and fermentation type. NOTE: These guidelines do not supersede any government regulations. Wine, mead, flavored malt beverages or beverages other than beer as defined by the TTB (U.S. Trade and Tax Bureau) are not considered “gluten-free beer” under these guidelines. Body is variable with style. At the competition director’s discretion, rapid detection methods may be used to qualify that a beer is indicated “gluten free” in testing. Gluten-reduced beers should be entered into the classic style category after which an entry was brewed. Gluten reduced beers’ original ingredients would have gluten content that has been reduced by enzymes or other processes to reduced levels.

  • 10AI - Non-Alcoholic (Beer) Malt Beverage

    Comments

    Non-Alcoholic (Beer) Malt Beverages are any range or color from very light to black. Non-alcoholic (NA) malt beverages can emulate the character of any previously listed beer category in these guidelines but without the alcohol (less than 0.5 percent). Non-alcoholic (beer) malt beverages will inherently have a profile lacking the complexity and balance of flavors which can be attributed to alcohol. They should accordingly not be assessed negatively for reasons related to the absence of alcohol. Non-alcoholic (NA) malt beverages should emulate the character of a previously listed category/subcategory designation but without the alcohol (less than 0.5 percent). Non-alcoholic (beer) malt beverages will inherently have a profile lacking the complexity and balance of flavors which can be attributed to alcohol. They should accordingly not be assessed negatively for reasons related to the absence of alcohol.

introduction to meads

The following discussion applies to all the mead styles, except where explicitly superseded in the sub-category guidelines. This introduction identifies common characteristics and descriptions for all types of mead, and should be used as a reference whenever entering or judging mead.

Important attributes that must be specified:

Sweetness.
A mead may be dry, semi-sweet, or sweet. Sweetness simply refers to the amount of residual sugar in the mead. Sweetness is often confused with fruitiness in a dry mead. Body is related to sweetness, but dry meads can still have some body. Dry meads do not have to be bone dry. Sweet meads should not be cloyingly sweet, and should not have a raw, unfermented honey character. Sweetness is independent of strength.
Strength.
A mead may be categorized as hydromel, standard, or sack strength. Strength refers to the alcohol content of the mead (and also, therefore, the amount of honey and fermentables used to make the mead). Stronger meads can have a greater honey character and body (as well as alcohol) than weaker meads, although this is not a strict rule.
Honey variety.
Some types of honey have a strong varietal character (aroma, flavor, color, acidity). If a honey is unusual, additional information can be provided to judges as to the character to be expected. Note that "wildflower" isn't a varietal honey; it is specifically a term used to describe a honey derived from unknown or mixed flowers.
Special ingredients.
Different sub-styles may include fruit, spice, malt, etc. Judges need to understand the ingredients that provide a unique character in order to properly evaluate the mead.

Common Mead Characteristics:

Appearance:
Clarity may be good to brilliant. Crystal clear, reflective examples with a bright, distinct meniscus are highly desirable. Observable particulates (even in a clear example) are undesirable. Highly carbonated examples usually have a short-lasting head similar to Champagne or soda pop. Some aspects of bubbles or head formation that may be observed and commented upon include size (large or small), persistence (how long do they continue to form?), quantity (how much are present?), rate (how fast do they form?), and mousse (appearance or quality of foam stand). The components of bubbles or head will vary greatly depending on the carbonation level, ingredients and type of mead. In general, smaller bubbles are more desirable and indicative of higher quality than larger bubbles. The color may vary widely depending on honey variety and any optional ingredients (e.g., fruit, malts). Some honey varieties are almost clear, while others can be dark brown. Most are in the straw to gold range. If no honey variety is declared, almost any color is acceptable. If a honey variety is declared, the color should generally be suggestive of the honey used (although a wide range of color variation is still possible). Hue, saturation and purity of color should be considered. Stronger versions (standard and sack) may show signs of body (e.g., legs, meniscus) but higher carbonation levels can interfere with this perception.
Aroma:
The intensity of the honey aroma will vary based upon the sweetness and strength of the mead. Stronger or sweeter meads may have a stronger honey aroma than drier or weaker versions. Different varieties of honey have different intensities and characters; some (e.g., orange blossom, buckwheat) are more recognizable than others (e.g., avocado, palmetto). If honey varieties are declared, the varietal character of the honey should be apparent even if subtle. The aromatics may seem vinous (similar to wine), and may include fruity, floral, or spicy notes. The bouquet (rich, complex smells arising from the combination of ingredients, fermentation and aging) should show a pleasant fermentation character, with clean and fresh aromatics being preferred over dirty, yeasty, or sulfury notes. A multi-faceted bouquet, also known as complexity or depth, is a positive attribute. Phenolic or diacetyl aromatics should not be present. Harsh or chemical aromatics should not be present. Light oxidation may be present, depending on age, and may result in sherry-like notes, which are acceptable in low to moderate levels (if in balance, these can add to complexity). An excessive sherry character is a fault in most styles (except certain Polish-style specialties, or other meads attempting a sherry-like character). Oxidation resulting in a papery character is always undesirable. Alcohol aromatics may be present, but hot, solventy or irritating overtones are a defect. The harmony and balance of the aroma and bouquet should be pleasant and enticing.
Flavor:
The intensity of the honey flavor will vary based upon the sweetness and strength of the mead. Stronger, sweeter meads will have a stronger honey flavor than drier, weaker versions. Different varieties of honey have different intensities and characters; some (e.g., orange blossom, buckwheat) are more recognizable than others (e.g., safflower, palmetto). If honey varieties are declared, the varietal character of the honey should be apparent even if subtle. The residual sweetness level will vary with the sweetness of the mead; dry meads will have no residual sugar, sweet meads will have noticeable to prominent sweetness, semi-sweet meads will have a balanced sweetness. In no case should the residual sweetness be syrupy, cloying or seem like unfermented honey. Any additives, such as acid or tannin, should enhance the honey flavor and lend balance to the overall character of the mead but not be excessively tart or astringent. Artificial, chemical, harsh, phenolic or bitter flavors are defects. Higher carbonation (if present) enhances the acidity and gives a "bite" to the finish. The aftertaste should be evaluated; longer finishes are generally most desirable. A multi-faceted flavor, also known as complexity or depth, is a positive attribute. Yeast or fermentation characteristics may be none to noticeable, with estery, fresh and clean flavors being most desirable. Alcohol flavors (if present) should be smooth and well-aged, not harsh or solventy. Light oxidation may be present, depending on age, but an excessive sherry-like or papery character should be avoided. Aging and conditioning generally smooth out flavors and create a more elegant, blended, rounded product. Flavors tend to become more subtle over time, and can deteriorate with extended aging.
Mouthfeel:
Before evaluating, refer to the declared sweetness, strength and carbonation levels, as well as any special ingredients. These can all affect mouthfeel. Smooth texture. Well-made examples will often have an elegant wine-like character. The body can vary widely, although most are in the medium-light to medium-full range. Body generally increases with stronger and/or sweeter meads, and can sometimes be quite full and heavy. Similarly, body generally decreases with lower gravity and/or drier meads, and can sometimes be quite light. Sensations of body should not be accompanied by an overwhelmingly cloying sweetness (even in sweet meads). A very thin or watery body is likewise undesirable. Some natural acidity is often present (particularly in fruit-based meads). Low levels of astringency are sometimes present (either from specific fruit or spices, or from tea, chemical additives or oak-aging). Acidity and tannin help balance the overall honey, sweetness and alcohol presentation. Carbonation can vary widely (see definitions above). Still meads may have a very light level of carbonation, lightly carbonated (petillant) meads will have noticeable bubbles, and a highly carbonated (sparkling) mead can range from a mouth-filling carbonation to levels approaching Champagne or soda pop. High carbonation will enhance the acidity and give a "bite" to the finish. A warming alcohol presence is often present, and this character usually increases with strength (although extended aging can smooth this sensation).
Overall Impression:
A wide range of results are possible, but well-made examples will have an enjoyable balance of honey flavors, sweetness, acidity, tannins, alcohol. Strength, sweetness and age greatly affect the overall presentation. Any special ingredients should be well-blended with the other ingredients, and lead to a harmonious end product.
Ingredients
Mead is made primarily from honey, water and yeast. Some minor adjustments in acidity and tannin can be made with citrus fruits, tea, chemicals, or the use of oak aging; however, these additives should not be readily discernable in flavor or aroma. Yeast nutrients may be used but should not be detected. If citrus, tea, or oak additives result in flavor components above a low, background, balance-adjusting level, the resulting mead should be entered appropriately (e.g., as a metheglin or open category mead, not a traditional).
Vital Statistics:
OG: hydromel: 1.035 - 1.080 standard: 1.080 - 1.120 sack: 1.120 - 1.170
ABV: hydromel: 3.5 - 7.5% standard: 7.5 - 14% sack: 14 - 18%
FG: dry: 0.990 - 1.010 semi-sweet: 1.010 - 1.025 sweet: 1.025 - 1.050
Note that the perception of sweetness is a function of the percentage of residual sugar, so don’t rely only on FG to determine sweetness. Consider the OG, strength, and to a lesser extent, acidity, in assessing sweetness.
IBUs: not relevant for anything but braggot, but bittering hops are optional even in this style.
SRM: basically irrelevant since honey can be anything from almost clear to dark brown. Melomels and pyments can have orange, red, pink and/or purple hues. Cysers are most often golden. Braggots can be yellow to black. In all cases, the color should reflect the ingredients used (type of honey, and fruit and/or malt in some styles).

Entering and Categorizing Meads:

Mandatory Requirements:
  • Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (still; petillant or lightly carbonated; sparkling or highly carbonated).
  • Entrants MUST specify strength level (hydromel or light mead; standard mead; sack or strong mead).
  • Entrants MUST specify sweetness level (dry; semi-sweet; sweet).
Optional Requirements:
Entrants MAY specify honey varieties used. If honey varieties are declared, judges will look for the varietal character of the honey. Note that the character of a varietal honey will be identifiable as distinct to the source flowers, but may not resemble the source plant, tree, or fruit. For example, orange-blossom honey has the character of orange blossoms, not oranges; blackberry honey is only distantly like blackberries, although it is an identifiable character.
Category-Specific Requirements:
Some categories require additional information, particularly in categories other than traditional mead. For example, declaring specific fruit, spices, or special characteristics. Supplemental materials may be provided to judges if an obscure ingredient or method is used.
Defaults:
If no attributes are specified, judges should evaluate the mead as a semi-sweet, petillant, standard-strength mead with no varietal honey character and no special ingredients. Competition organizers should make every effort to ensure that judges are provided the full set of attributes of the meads being evaluated.

Category 11 - Traditional Mead

See the Introduction to Mead Guidelines

  • 11A - Dry Mead

    Aroma

    Honey aroma may be subtle, although not always identifiable. Sweetness or significant honey aromatics should not be expected. If a honey variety is declared, the variety should be distinctive (if noticeable). Different types of honey have different intensities and characters. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

    Appearance

    Standard description applies.

    Flavour

    Subtle (if any) honey character, and may feature subtle to noticeable varietal character if a varietal honey is declared (different varieties have different intensities). No to minimal residual sweetness with a dry finish. Sulfury, harsh or yeasty fermentation characteristics are undesirable. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

    Mouthfeel

    Standard description applies, although the body is generally light to medium. Note that stronger meads will have a fuller body. Sensations of body should not be accompanied by noticeable residual sweetness.

    Impression

    Similar in balance, body, finish and flavor intensity to a dry white wine, with a pleasant mixture of subtle honey character, soft fruity esters, and clean alcohol. Complexity, harmony, and balance of sensory elements are most desirable, with no inconsistencies in color, aroma, flavor or aftertaste. The proper balance of sweetness, acidity, alcohol and honey character is the essential final measure of any mead.

    Comments

    See standard description for entrance requirements. Entrants MUST specify carbonation level and strength. Sweetness is assumed to be DRY in this category. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties.

    Ingredients

    Standard description applies. Traditional Meads feature the character of a blended honey or a blend of honeys. Varietal meads feature the distinctive character of certain honeys. "Show meads" feature no additives, but this distinction is usually not obvious to judges.

  • 11B - Semi-sweet Mead

    Aroma

    Honey aroma should be noticeable, and can have a light sweetness that may express the aroma of flower nectar. If a variety of honey is declared, the aroma might have a subtle to very noticeable varietal character reflective of the honey (different varieties have different intensities and characters). Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

    Appearance

    Standard description applies.

    Flavour

    Subtle to moderate honey character, and may feature subtle to noticeable varietal character if a varietal honey is declared (different varieties have different intensities). Subtle to moderate residual sweetness with a medium-dry finish. Sulfury, harsh or yeasty fermentation characteristics are undesirable. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

    Mouthfeel

    Standard description applies, although the body is generally medium-light to medium-full. Note that stronger meads will have a fuller body. Sensations of body should not be accompanied by a residual sweetness that is higher than moderate.

    Impression

    Similar in balance, body, finish and flavor intensity to a semisweet (or medium-dry) white wine, with a pleasant mixture of honey character, light sweetness, soft fruity esters, and clean alcohol. Complexity, harmony, and balance of sensory elements are most desirable, with no inconsistencies in color, aroma, flavor or aftertaste. The proper balance of sweetness, acidity, alcohol and honey character is the essential final measure of any mead.

    Comments

    See standard description for entrance requirements. Entrants MUST specify carbonation level and strength. Sweetness is assumed to be SEMI-SWEET in this category. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties.

    Ingredients

    Standard description applies. Traditional Meads feature the character of a blended honey or a blend of honeys. Varietal meads feature the distinctive character of certain honeys. "Show meads" feature no additives, but this distinction is usually not obvious to judges.

  • 11C - Sweet Mead

    Aroma

    Honey aroma should dominate, and is often moderately to strongly sweet and usually expresses the aroma of flower nectar. If a variety of honey is declared, the aroma might have a subtle to very noticeable varietal character reflective of the honey (different varieties have different intensities and characters). Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

    Appearance

    Standard description applies.

    Flavour

    Moderate to significant honey character, and may feature moderate to prominent varietal character if a varietal honey is declared (different varieties have different intensities). Moderate to high residual sweetness with a sweet and full (but not cloying) finish. Sulfury, harsh or yeasty fermentation characteristics are undesirable. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

    Mouthfeel

    Standard description applies, although the body is generally medium-full to full. Note that stronger meads will have a fuller body. Many seem like a dessert wine. Sensations of body should not be accompanied by cloying, raw residual sweetness.

    Impression

    Similar in balance, body, finish and flavor intensity to a well-made dessert wine (such as Sauternes), with a pleasant mixture of honey character, residual sweetness, soft fruity esters, and clean alcohol. Complexity, harmony, and balance of sensory elements are most desirable, with no inconsistencies in color, aroma, flavor or aftertaste. The proper balance of sweetness, acidity, alcohol and honey character is the essential final measure of any mead.

    Comments

    See standard description for entrance requirements. Entrants MUST specify carbonation level and strength. Sweetness is assumed to be SWEET in this category. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties.

    Ingredients

    Standard description applies. Traditional Meads feature the character of a blended honey or a blend of honeys. Varietal meads feature the distinctive character of certain honeys. "Show meads" feature no additives, but this distinction is usually not obvious to judges.

Category 12 - Melomel (Fruit Mead)

See the Introduction to Mead Guidelines for detailed descriptions of standard mead characteristics, an explanation of standard terms, and entering instructions. Refer to Category 11 descriptions for additional detail on the character to be expected from dry, semisweet and sweet meads. Use those guidelines to judge distinctions between the various sweetness levels. Judging meads from dry to sweet is recommended as the primary ordering, with strength being the secondary ordering criterion.

  • 12A - Cyser

    Aroma

    Depending on the sweetness and strength, a subtle to distinctly identifiable honey and apple/cider character (dry and/or hydromel versions will tend to have lower aromatics than sweet and/or sack versions). The apple/cider character should be clean and distinctive; it can express a range of apple-based character ranging from a subtle fruitiness to a single varietal apple character (if declared) to a complex blend of apple aromatics. Some spicy or earthy notes may be present, as may a slightly sulfury character. The honey aroma should be noticeable, and can have a light to significant sweetness that may express the aroma of flower nectar. If a variety of honey is declared, the aroma might have a subtle to very noticeable varietal character reflective of the honey (different varieties have different intensities and characters). The bouquet should show a pleasant fermentation character, with clean and fresh aromatics being preferred. Stronger and/or sweeter versions will have higher alcohol and sweetness in the nose. Slight spicy phenolics from certain apple varieties are acceptable, as is a light diacetyl character from malolactic fermentation (both are optional). Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

    Appearance

    Standard description applies, except with regard to color. Color may range from pale straw to deep golden amber (most are yellow to gold), depending on the variety of honey and blend of apples or ciders used.

    Flavour

    The apple and honey flavor intensity may vary from none to high; the residual sweetness may vary from none to high; and the finish may range from dry to sweet, depending on what sweetness level has been declared (dry to sweet) and strength level has been declared (hydromel to sack). Natural acidity and tannin in apples may give some tartness and astringency to balance the sweetness, honey flavor and alcohol. A cyser may have a subtle to strong honey character, and may feature noticeable to prominent varietal character if a varietal honey is declared (different varieties have different intensities). Slight spicy phenolics from certain apple varieties are acceptable, as are a light diacetyl character from malolactic fermentation and a slight sulfur character (all are optional). Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

    Mouthfeel

    Standard description applies. Often wine-like. Some natural acidity is usually present (from the blend of apples) and helps balance the overall impression. Some apples can provide natural astringency, but this character should not be excessive.

    Impression

    In well-made examples of the style, the fruit is both distinctive and well-incorporated into the honey-sweet-acid-tannin-alcohol balance of the mead. Some of the best strong examples have the taste and aroma of an aged Calvados (apple brandy from northern France), while subtle, dry versions can taste similar to many fine white wines.

    Comments

    There should be an appealing blend of the fruit and honey character but not necessarily an even balance. Generally a good tannin-sweetness balance is desired, though very dry and very sweet examples do exist. See standard description for entrance requirements. Entrants MUST specify carbonation level, strength, and sweetness. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties. Entrants MAY specify the varieties of apple used; if specified, a varietal character will be expected. Products with a relatively low proportion of honey are better entered as a Specialty Cider.

    Ingredients

    Standard description applies. Cyser is a standard mead made with the addition of apples or apple juice. Traditionally, cysers are made by the addition of honey to apple juice without additional water. A spiced cyser, or a cyser with other ingredients, should be entered as an Open Category Mead.

  • 12B - Pyment

    Aroma

    Depending on the sweetness and strength, a subtle to distinctly identifiable honey and grape/wine character (dry and/or hydromel versions will tend to have lower aromatics than sweet and/or sack versions). The grape/wine character should be clean and distinctive; it can express a range of grape-based character ranging from a subtle fruitiness to a single varietal grape character (if declared) to a complex blend of grape or wine aromatics. Some complex, spicy, grassy or earthy notes may be present (as in wine). The honey aroma should be noticeable, and can have a light to significant sweetness that may express the aroma of flower nectar. If a variety of honey is declared, the aroma might have a subtle to very noticeable varietal character reflective of the honey (different varieties have different intensities and characters). The bouquet should show a pleasant fermentation character, with clean and fresh aromatics being preferred. Stronger and/or sweeter versions will have higher alcohol and sweetness in the nose. Slight spicy phenolics from certain red grape varieties are acceptable, as is a light diacetyl character from malolactic fermentation in certain white grape varieties (both are optional). Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

    Appearance

    Standard description applies, except with regard to color. Color may range from pale straw to deep purple-red, depending on the variety of grapes and honey used. The color should be characteristic of the variety or type of grape used, although white grape varieties may also take on color derived from the honey variety.

    Flavour

    The grape/wine and honey flavor intensity may vary from subtle to high; the residual sweetness may vary from none to high; and the finish may range from dry to sweet, depending on what sweetness level has been declared (dry to sweet) and strength level has been declared (hydromel to sack). Natural acidity and tannin in grapes may give some tartness and astringency to balance the sweetness, honey flavor and alcohol. A pyment may have a subtle to strong honey character, and may feature noticeable to prominent varietal character if a varietal honey is declared (different varieties have different intensities). Depending on the grape variety, some fruity, spicy, grassy, buttery, earthy, minerally, and/or floral flavors may be present. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

    Mouthfeel

    Standard description applies. Wine-like. Some natural acidity is usually present (from grapes) and helps balance the overall impression. Grape tannin and/or grape skins can add body as well as some astringency, although this character should not be excessive. Longer aging can smooth out tannin-based astringency.

    Impression

    In well-made examples of the style, the grape is both distinctively vinous and well-incorporated into the honey-sweet-acid-tannin-alcohol balance of the mead. White and red versions can be quite different, and the overall impression should be characteristic of the type of grapes used and suggestive of a similar variety wine.

    Comments

    There should be an appealing blend of the fruit and honey character but not necessarily an even balance. Generally a good tannin-sweetness balance is desired, though very dry and very sweet examples do exist. See standard description for entrance requirements. Entrants MUST specify carbonation level, strength, and sweetness. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties. Entrants MAY specify the varieties of grape used; if specified, a varietal character will be expected.

  • 12C - Other Fruit Melomel

    Aroma

    Depending on the sweetness and strength, a subtle to distinctly identifiable honey and fruit character (dry and/or hydromel versions will tend to have lower aromatics than sweet and/or sack versions). The fruit character should display distinctive aromatics associated with the particular fruit(s); however, note that some fruit (e.g., raspberries, cherries) have stronger aromas and are more distinctive than others (e.g., blueberries, strawberries)–allow for a range of fruit character and intensity from subtle to aggressive. The fruit character should be pleasant and supportive, not artificial and inappropriately overpowering (considering the character of the fruit). In a blended fruit melomel, not all fruit may be individually identifiable or of equal intensity. The honey aroma should be noticeable, and can have a light to significant sweetness that may express the aroma of flower nectar. If a variety of honey is declared, the aroma might have a subtle to very noticeable varietal character reflective of the honey (different varieties have different intensities and characters). The bouquet should show a pleasant fermentation character, with clean and fresh aromatics being preferred. Stronger and/or sweeter versions will have higher alcohol and sweetness in the nose. Some tartness may be present if naturally occurring in the particular fruit(s), but should not be inappropriately intense. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

    Appearance

    Standard description applies, except with regard to color. Color may take on a very wide range of colors, depending on the variety of fruit and/or honey used. For lighter-colored melomels with fruits that exhibit distinctive colors, the color should be noticeable. Note that the color of fruit in mead is often lighter than the flesh of the fruit itself and may take on slightly different shades. Meads made with lighter color fruits can also take on color from varietal honeys. In meads that produce a head, the head can take on some of the fruit color as well.

    Flavour

    The fruit and honey flavor intensity may vary from subtle to high; the residual sweetness may vary from none to high; and the finish may range from dry to sweet, depending on what sweetness level has been declared (dry to sweet) and strength level has been declared (hydromel to sack). Natural acidity and tannin in some fruit and fruit skin may give some tartness and astringency to balance the sweetness, honey flavor and alcohol. A melomel may have a subtle to strong honey character, and may feature noticeable to prominent varietal character if a varietal honey is declared (different varieties have different intensities). The distinctive flavor character associated with the particular fruit(s) should be noticeable, and may range in intensity from subtle to aggressive. The balance of fruit with the underlying mead is vital, and the fruit character should not be artificial and/or inappropriately overpowering. In a blended fruit melomel, not all fruit may be individually identifiable or of equal intensity. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

    Mouthfeel

    Standard description applies. Most will be wine-like. Some natural acidity and/or astringency are sometimes present (from certain fruit and/or fruit skin) and helps balance the overall impression. Fruit tannin can add body as well as some astringency. High levels of astringency are undesirable. The acidity and astringency levels should be somewhat reflective of the fruit used.

    Impression

    In well-made examples of the style, the fruit is both distinctive and well-incorporated into the honey-sweet-acid-tannin-alcohol balance of the mead. Different types of fruit can result in widely different characteristics; allow for a variation in the final product.

    Ingredients

    Standard description applies. A melomel is a standard mead made with the addition of other fruit or fruit juices. There should be an appealing blend of the fruit and honey character but not necessarily an even balance. A melomel can be made with a blend of fruits; however, a melomel that is spiced or that contains other ingredients should be entered as an Open Category Mead. Melomels made with either apples or grapes should be entered as Cysers and Pyments, respectively.

    Exceptions: Generally a good tannin-sweetness balance is desired, though very dry and very sweet examples do exist. Some fruits, notably darker ones like Blackberries, may contribute a tannin presence similar to a red wine. Some oxidative properties may be appropriate in certain fruit meads, giving them a sherry or port wine character. See standard description for entrance requirements. Entrants MUST specify carbonation level, strength, and sweetness. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties. Entrants MUST specify the varieties of fruit used.

Category 13 - Other Mead

See the Introduction to Mead Guidelines for detailed descriptions of standard mead characteristics, an explanation of standard terms, and entering instructions. Refer to Category 11 descriptions for additional detail on the character to be expected from dry, semisweet and sweet meads. Use those guidelines to judge distinctions between the various sweetness levels. Judging meads from dry to sweet is recommended as the primary ordering, with strength being the secondary ordering criterion.

  • 13A - Metheglin

    Aroma

    Depending on the sweetness and strength, a subtle to distinctly identifiable honey and herb/spice character (dry and/or hydromel versions will tend to have lower aromatics than sweet and/or sack versions). The herb/spice character should display distinctive aromatics associated with the particular herbs/spices; however, note that some herbs/spices (e.g., ginger, cinnamon) have stronger aromas and are more distinctive than others (e.g., chamomile, lavender)–allow for a range of herb/spice character and intensity from subtle to aggressive. The herb/spice character should be pleasant and supportive, not artificial and inappropriately overpowering (considering the character of the herb/spice). In a blended herb/spice metheglin, not all herbs/spices may be individually identifiable or of equal intensity. The honey aroma should be noticeable, and can have a light to significant sweetness that may express the aroma of flower nectar. If a variety of honey is declared, the aroma might have a subtle to very noticeable varietal character reflective of the honey (different varieties have different intensities and characters). The bouquet should show a pleasant fermentation character, with clean and fresh aromatics being preferred. Stronger and/or sweeter versions will have higher alcohol and sweetness in the nose. Some herbs and spices may produce spicy or peppery phenolics. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

    Appearance

    Standard description applies, except perhaps to note that the color usually won't be affected by spices and herbs (although flowers, petals and peppers may provide subtle colors; tea blends may provide significant colors).

    Flavour

    The herb/spice flavor intensity may vary from subtle to high; the honey flavor intensity may vary from subtle to high; the residual sweetness may vary from none to high; and the finish may range from dry to sweet, depending on what sweetness level has been declared (dry to sweet) and strength level has been declared (hydromel to sack). The distinctive flavor character associated with the particular herbs/spices may range in intensity from subtle to aggressive (although some herbs/spices may not be individually recognizable, and can just serve to add a background complexity). Certain herbs and spices might add bitter, astringent, phenolic or spicy (hot) flavors; if present, these qualities should be related to the declared ingredients (otherwise, they are faults), and they should balance and blend with the honey, sweetness and alcohol. Metheglins containing more than one herb/spice should have a good balance among the different herbs/spices, though some herbs/spices will tend to dominate the flavor profile. A metheglin may have a subtle to strong honey character, and may feature noticeable to prominent varietal character if a varietal honey is declared (different varieties have different intensities). Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

    Mouthfeel

    Standard description applies. Some herbs or spices may contain tannins that add a bit of body and some astringency, but this character should not be excessive.

    Impression

    In well-made examples of the style, the herbs/spices are both distinctive and well-incorporated into the honey-sweet-acid-tannin-alcohol balance of the mead. Different types of herbs/spices can result in widely different characteristics; allow for a variation in the final product.

    Comments

    Often, a blend of spices may give a character greater than the sum of its parts. The better examples of this style use spices/herbs subtly and when more than one are used, they are carefully selected so that they blend harmoniously. See standard description for entrance requirements. Entrants MUST specify carbonation level, strength, and sweetness. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties. Entrants MUST specify the types of spices used.

    Ingredients

    Standard description applies. A metheglin is a standard mead made with the addition of spices or herbs. Meads made with flowers (such as rose petal mead, or rhodomel), chocolate, coffee, nuts or chile peppers (capsimel/capsicumel) may also be entered in this category, as can meads made with a blend of spices. If spices are used in conjunction with other ingredients such as fruit, cider, or other fermentables, then the mead should be entered as an Open Category Mead.

  • 13B - Braggot

    Aroma

    Depending on the sweetness, strength and base style of beer, a subtle to distinctly identifiable honey and beer character (dry and/or hydromel versions will tend to have lower aromatics than sweet and/or sack versions). The honey and beer/malt character should be complementary and balanced, although not always evenly balanced. If a variety of honey is declared, the aroma might have a subtle to very noticeable varietal character reflective of the honey (different varieties have different intensities and characters). If a base style of beer or type of malt is declared, the aroma might have a subtle to very noticeable character reflective of the beer style (different styles and malts have different intensities and characters). A hop aroma (any variety or intensity) is optional; if present, it should blend harmoniously with the other elements. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

    Appearance

    Standard description does not apply due to beer-like characteristics. Clarity may be good to brilliant, although many braggots are not as clear as other meads. A light to moderate head with some retention is expected. Color may range from light straw to dark brown or black, depending on the variety of malt and honey used. The color should be characteristic of the declared beer style and/or honey used, if a variety is declared. Stronger versions may show signs of body (e.g., legs).

    Flavour

    Displays a balanced character identifiable as both a beer and a mead, although the relative intensity of flavors is greatly affected by the sweetness, strength, base style of beer, and variety of honey used. If a beer style is declared, the braggot should have some character traceable to the style although the flavors will be different due to the presence of honey. If a variety of honey is declared, the braggot should feature a subtle to prominent varietal character (different varieties have different intensities). Stronger and/or sweeter braggots should be expected to have a greater intensity of flavor than drier, lower gravity versions. The finish and aftertaste will vary based on the declared level of sweetness (dry to sweet), and may include both beer and mead components. A wide range of malt characteristics is allowable, from plain base malts to rich caramel and toast flavors to dark chocolate and roast flavors. Hop bitterness and flavor may be present, and may reflect any variety or intensity; however, this optional character should always be both suggestive of the base beer style and well blended with the other flavors. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

    Mouthfeel

    Standard description does not apply due to beer-like characteristics. Smooth mouthfeel without astringency. Body may vary from moderately light to full, depending on sweetness, strength, and the base style of beer. Note that stronger meads will have a fuller body. A very thin or watery body is undesirable, as is a cloying, raw sweetness. A warming sense of well-aged alcohol may be present in stronger examples. Carbonation will vary as described in the standard description. A still braggot will usually have some level of carbonation (like a cask bitter) since a completely flat beer is unappetizing. However, just as an aged barleywine may be still, some braggots can be totally still.

    Impression

    A harmonious blend of mead and beer, with the distinctive characteristics of both. A wide range of results are possible, depending on the base style of beer, variety of honey and overall sweetness and strength. Beer flavors tend to somewhat mask typical honey flavors found in other meads.

    Comments

    Sometimes known as "bracket" or "brackett." The fermentable sugars come from a balance of malt or malt extract and honey, although the specific balance is open to creative interpretation by brewers. See standard description for entrance requirements. Entrants MUST specify carbonation level, strength, and sweetness. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties. Entrants MAY specify the base style or beer or types of malt used. Products with a relatively low proportion of honey should be entered in the Specialty Beer category as a Honey Beer.

    Ingredients

    A braggot is a standard mead made with both honey and malt providing flavor and fermentable extract. Originally, and alternatively, a mixture of mead and ale. A braggot can be made with any type of honey, and any type of base beer style. The malt component may be derived from grain or malt extracts. The beer may be hopped or not. If any other ingredients than honey and beer are contained in the braggot, it should be entered as an Open Category Mead. Smoked braggots may be entered in this category if using smoked malt or a smoked beer as the base style; braggots made using other smoked ingredients (e.g., liquid smoke, chipotles) should be entered in the Open Category Mead style.

  • 13C - Open Category Mead

    Comments

    See standard description for entrance requirements. Entrants MUST specify carbonation level, strength, and sweetness. Entrants MAY specify honey varieties. Entrants MUST specify the special nature of the mead, whether it is a combination of existing styles, an experimental mead, a historical mead, or some other creation. Any special ingredients that impart an identifiable character MAY be declared.

introduction to cider guidelines

Cider is fermented apple juice. Perry is fermented pear juice. There are two categories for cider/perry: Standard (Category 14) and Specialty (Category 25). The Standard category covers ciders and perries made primarily or entirely from the juice of apples or pears (but not both at once). The only adjunct permitted in the Standard category, and only in some sub-categories, is a limited addition of sugar to achieve a suitable starting gravity. Note that honey is not a "sugar" for this purpose; a cider made with added honey must be entered either as a Specialty cider or as a Cyser under the appropriate mead sub-category. Other sugar sources that also add significant flavors (brown sugar, molasses) would also create a Specialty cider (such as New England style).

Aroma and Flavor:

  • Ciders and perries do not necessarily present overtly fruity aromas or flavors–in the same sense that a wine does not taste overtly of grapes. Drier styles of cider in particular develop more complex but less fruity characters. In fact, a simple "apple soda" or "wine cooler" character is not desirable in a cider or perry.
  • Some styles of cider exhibit distinctly NON-fruity tastes or aromas, such as the "smoky bacon" undertones of a dry English cider.
  • The sweetness (residual sugar, or RS) of a cider or perry may vary from absolutely dry (no RS) to as much as a sweet dessert wine (10% or more RS). In sweeter ciders, other components of taste–particularly acidity–must balance the sweetness. The level of sweetness must be specified in order to arrange flights of tastings and entries within flights. Tasting always proceeds from drier to sweeter. There are three categories of sweetness:
    1. Dry: below 0.9% residual sugar. This corresponds to a final specific gravity of under 1.002.
    2. Medium: in the range between dry and sweet (0.9% to 4% residual sugar, final gravity 1.002 to 1.012). Sometimes characterized as either 'off-dry' or 'semi-sweet.'
    3. Sweet: above 4% residual sugar, roughly equivalent to a final gravity of over 1.012.
  • If a cider is close to one of these boundaries, it should be identified by the sweetness category which best describes the overall impression it gives.
  • Acidity is an essential element of cider and perry: it must be sufficient to give a clean, refreshing impression without being puckering. Acidity (from malic and in some cases lactic acids) must not be confused with acetification (from acetic acid–vinegar): the acrid aroma and tingling taste of acetification is a fault.
  • Ciders and perries vary considerably in tannin. This affects both bitterness and astringency (see "Mouthfeel" below). If made from culinary or table fruit, tannins are typically low; nevertheless some tannin is desirable to balance the character. The character contributed by tannin should be mainly astringency rather than bitterness. An overt or forward bitterness is a fault (and is often due to processing techniques rather than fruit).

Appearance:

  • Clarity may vary from good to brilliant. The lack of sparkling clarity is not a fault, but visible particles are undesirable. In some styles a "rustic" lack of brilliance is common. Perries are notoriously difficult to clear; as a result a slight haze is not a fault. However, a "sheen" in either cider or perry generally indicates the early stage of lactic contamination and is a distinct fault.
  • Carbonation may vary from entirely still to a champagne level. No or little carbonation is termed still. A moderate carbonation level is termed petillant. Highly carbonated is termed sparkling. At the higher levels of carbonation, the "mousse" (head) may be retained for a short time. However, gushing, foaming, and difficult-to-manage heads are faults.

Mouthfeel:

  • In general, cider and perry have a mouthfeel and fullness akin to a substantial white wine. The body is less than that of beers. Full-sparkling ciders will be champagne-like.

Ingredients:

  • The apple and pear varieties are intended to illustrate commonly used examples, not dictate requirements when making the style. In general, adjuncts are prohibited except where specifically allowed in particular styles, and then the entrant must state them. Common processing aids, and enzymes, are generally allowed as long as they are not detectable in the finished cider. Yeast used for cider/perry may be either "natural" (the yeast which occurs on the fruit itself and/or is retained in the milling and pressing equipment) or cultured yeast. Malo-lactic fermentation is allowed, either naturally occurring or with an added ML culture. Enzymes may be used for clarification of the juice prior to fermentation. Malic acid may be added to a low-acid juice to bring acidity up to a level considered safe for avoiding bacterial contamination and off-flavors (typically pH 3.8 or below). Entrant MUST state if malic acid was added. Sulfites may be added as needed for microbiological control. If used, the maximum accepted safe level for sulfites (200 mg/l) should be strictly observed; moreover, any excess sulfite that is detectable in the finished cider (a "burning match" character) is a serious fault.
  • Sorbate may be added at bottling to stabilize the cider. However, any residual aroma/flavor from misuse or excessive use of sorbate (e.g., a "geranium" note) is a distinct fault.
  • Carbonation may be either natural (by maintaining CO2 pressure through processing or by bottle-conditioning) or added (by CO2 injection).

Category 14 - Standard Cider and Perry

The styles represented in this category are the principal established styles. The Common Cider and Common Perry styles are analogous to the cider and perry categories of earlier style standards. There are well-known styles not represented here–for example, Asturian (Spanish)–for which there are presently insufficient appreciation and a lack of commercial examples for reference. In the case of a cider made to a style not explicitly represented here, it should be entered in the closest applicable category. The first decision is whether the cider was made with apples with significant tannin content that gives the cider noticeable astringency or bitterness. If not, it should be entered as a Common Cider. If so, the choice is between the English and French sub-categories; this decision should be based on whether the cider tends more toward sweet, rich, somewhat fruity (French) or drier and more austere (English). For perry of a non-represented style, the decision is, as above, based on tannin content. If in doubt, enter as Common Perry.

  • 14A - Common Cider

    Aroma

    Sweet or low-alcohol ciders may have apple aroma and flavor. Dry ciders will be more wine-like with some esters. Sugar and acidity should combine to give a refreshing character, neither cloying nor too austere. Medium to high acidity.

    Appearance

    Clear to brilliant, medium to deep gold color.

    Flavour

    Sweet or low-alcohol ciders may have apple aroma and flavor. Dry ciders will be more wine-like with some esters. Sugar and acidity should combine to give a refreshing character, neither cloying nor too austere. Medium to high acidity.

    Mouthfeel

    Medium body. Some tannin should be present for slight to moderate astringency, but little bitterness.

    Impression

    Variable, but should be a medium, refreshing drink. Sweet ciders must not be cloying. Dry ciders must not be too austere. An ideal cider serves well as a "session" drink, and suitably accompanies a wide variety of food.

    Comments

    Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (still, petillant, or sparkling). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (dry, medium, sweet).

    Stats

    OG 1.045 — 1.065
    FG 1.000 — 1.020
    ABV 5.0 — 8.0
  • 14B - English Cider

    Aroma

    No overt apple character, but various flavors and esters that suggest apples. May have "smoky (bacon)" character from a combination of apple varieties and MLF. Some "Farmyard nose" may be present but must not dominate; mousiness is a serious fault. The common slight farmyard nose of an English West Country cider is the result of lactic acid bacteria, not a Brettanomyces contamination.

    Appearance

    Slightly cloudy to brilliant. Medium to deep gold color.

    Flavour

    No overt apple character, but various flavors and esters that suggest apples. May have "smoky (bacon)" character from a combination of apple varieties and MLF. Some "Farmyard nose" may be present but must not dominate; mousiness is a serious fault. The common slight farmyard nose of an English West Country cider is the result of lactic acid bacteria, not a Brettanomyces contamination.

    Mouthfeel

    Full. Moderate to high tannin apparent as astringency and some bitterness. Carbonation still to moderate, never high or gushing.

    Impression

    Generally dry, full-bodied, austere.

    Comments

    Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (still or petillant). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (dry to medium). Entrants MAY specify variety of apple for a single varietal cider; if specified, varietal character will be expected.

    Stats

    OG 1.050 — 1.075
    FG 0.995 — 1.010
    ABV 6.0 — 9.0
  • 14C - French Cider

    Aroma

    Fruity character/aroma. This may come from slow or arrested fermentation (in the French technique of défécation) or approximated by back sweetening with juice. Tends to a rich fullness.

    Appearance

    Clear to brilliant, medium to deep gold color.

    Flavour

    Fruity character/aroma. This may come from slow or arrested fermentation (in the French technique of défécation) or approximated by back sweetening with juice. Tends to a rich fullness.

    Mouthfeel

    Medium to full, mouth filling. Moderate tannin apparent mainly as astringency. Carbonation moderate to champagne-like, but at higher levels it must not gush or foam.

    Impression

    Medium to sweet, full-bodied, rich.

    Comments

    Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (petillant or full). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (medium, sweet). Entrants MAY specify variety of apple for a single varietal cider; if specified, varietal character will be expected.

    Stats

    OG 1.050 — 1.065
    FG 1.010 — 1.020
    ABV 3.0 — 6.0
  • 14D - Common Perry

    Aroma

    There is a pear character, but not obviously fruity. It tends toward that of a young white wine. No bitterness.

    Appearance

    Slightly cloudy to clear. Generally quite pale.

    Flavour

    There is a pear character, but not obviously fruity. It tends toward that of a young white wine. No bitterness.

    Mouthfeel

    : Relatively full, low to moderate tannin apparent as astringency.

    Impression

    Mild. Medium to medium-sweet. Still to lightly sparkling. Only very slight acetification is acceptable. Mousiness, ropy/oily characters are serious faults.

    Comments

    Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (still, petillant, or sparkling). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (medium or sweet).

    Stats

    OG 1.050 — 1.060
    FG 1.000 — 1.020
    ABV 5.0 — 7.2
  • 14E - Traditional Perry

    Aroma

    There is a pear character, but not obviously fruity. It tends toward that of a young white wine. Some slight bitterness.

    Appearance

    Slightly cloudy to clear. Generally quite pale.

    Flavour

    There is a pear character, but not obviously fruity. It tends toward that of a young white wine. Some slight bitterness.

    Mouthfeel

    Relatively full, moderate to high tannin apparent as astringency.

    Impression

    Tannic. Medium to medium-sweet. Still to lightly sparkling. Only very slight acetification is acceptable. Mousiness, ropy/oily characters are serious faults.

    Comments

    Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (still, petillant, or sparkling). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (medium or sweet). Variety of pear(s) used must be stated.

    Stats

    OG 1.050 — 1.070
    FG 1.000 — 1.020
    ABV 5.0 — 9.0

Category 15 - Specialty Cider and Perry

Specialty cider/perry includes beverages made with added flavorings (spices and/or other fruits), those made with substantial amounts of sugar-sources to increase starting gravities, and the beverage made from a combination of apple and pear juice (sometimes called "pider"). The same general characteristics and fault descriptions apply to specialty ciders as to standard ciders (preceding category), with the exception of adjuncts allowed.

  • 15A - New England Cider

    Aroma

    A dry flavorful cider with robust apple character, strong alcohol, and derivative flavors from sugar adjuncts.

    Appearance

    to brilliant, pale to medium yellow.

    Flavour

    A dry flavorful cider with robust apple character, strong alcohol, and derivative flavors from sugar adjuncts

    Mouthfeel

    Substantial, alcoholic. Moderate tannin.

    Impression

    Substantial body and character .

    Comments

    Adjuncts may include white and brown sugars, molasses, small amounts of honey, and raisins. Adjuncts are intended to raise OG well above that which would be achieved by apples alone. This style is sometimes barrel-aged, in which case there will be oak character as with a barrel-aged wine. If the barrel was formerly used to age spirits, some flavor notes from the spirit (e.g., whisky or rum) may also be present, but must be subtle. Entrants MUST specify if the cider was barrel-fermented or aged. Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (still, petillant, or sparkling). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (dry, medium, or sweet).

    Stats

    OG 1.060 — 1.100
    FG 0.995 — 1.010
    ABV 7.0 — 13.0
  • 15B - Fruit Cider

    Aroma

    The cider character must be present and must fit with the other fruits. It is a fault if the adjuncts completely dominate; a judge might ask, "Would this be different if neutral spirits replaced the cider?" A fruit cider should not be like an alco-pop. Oxidation is a fault.

    Appearance

    Clear to brilliant. Color appropriate to added fruit, but should not show oxidation characteristics. (For example, berries should give red-to-purple color, not orange.)

    Flavour

    The cider character must be present and must fit with the other fruits. It is a fault if the adjuncts completely dominate; a judge might ask, "Would this be different if neutral spirits replaced the cider?" A fruit cider should not be like an alco-pop. Oxidation is a fault.

    Mouthfeel

    Substantial. May be significantly tannic depending on fruit added.

    Impression

    Like a dry wine with complex flavors. The apple character must marry with the added fruit so that neither dominates the other.

    Comments

    Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (still, petillant, or sparkling). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (dry or medium). Entrants MUST specify what fruit(s) and/or fruit juice(s) were added.

    Stats

    OG 1.045 — 1.070
    FG 0.995 — 1.010
    ABV 5.0 — 9.0
  • 15C - Applewine

    Aroma

    Comparable to a Common Cider. Cider character must be distinctive. Very dry to slightly medium.

    Appearance

    Clear to brilliant, pale to medium-gold. Cloudiness or hazes are inappropriate. Dark colors are not expected unless strongly tannic varieties of fruit were used.

    Flavour

    Comparable to a Common Cider. Cider character must be distinctive. Very dry to slightly medium.

    Mouthfeel

    Lighter than other ciders, because higher alcohol is derived from addition of sugar rather than juice. Carbonation may range from still to champagne-like.

    Impression

    Like a dry white wine, balanced, and with low astringency and bitterness.

    Comments

    Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (still, petillant, or sparkling). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (dry or medium).

    Stats

    OG 1.070 — 1.100
    FG 0.995 — 1.010
    ABV 9.0 — 12.0
  • 15D - Other Specialty Cider/Perry

    Aroma

    The cider character must always be present, and must fit with adjuncts.

    Appearance

    Clear to brilliant. Color should be that of a common cider unless adjuncts are expected to contribute color.

    Flavour

    The cider character must always be present, and must fit with adjuncts.

    Mouthfeel

    Average body, may show tannic (astringent) or heavy body as determined by adjuncts.

    Impression

    Comments

    Entrants MUST specify all major ingredients and adjuncts. Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (still, petillant, or sparkling). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (dry or medium).

    Stats

    OG 1.045 — 1.100
    ABV 5.0 — 12.0